red-green colour deficiency

red-green colour deficiency 

A general term indicating a colour vision deficiency, which is either of the deutan (green colour vision defect) or of the protan (red colour vision defect) type. These defects are mostly her-editary and affect both eyes equally. Most cases are inherited in X-linked recessive manner. See defective colour vision; Kollner's rule.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
3 Knowledge of the characteristics of different types of inherited red-green colour deficiency
Identification of red-green colour deficiency is an integral part of a complete eye examination approved by the GOC and endorsed by the College of Optometrists.
The spectral anomaloscope, such as the Nagel anomaloscope, is the accepted reference test for congenital red-green colour deficiency.
When doctors with a red-green colour deficiency were asked to assess clinical photographs to determine whether an abnormality was present, in some instances they failed to spot the signs of an illness (31,32) or to correctly outline the area of abnormality.
In fact, just this year, a group of researchers reported that they were able to cure adult monkeys of red-green colour deficiency with gene therapy.
Toxicity has been associated with a predominantly red-green colour deficiency.
This includes either red-green colour deficiency, which can vary in severity, or the more rare yellow-blue colour deficiency that affects around one person in 20,000.