recurrent fever


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Related to recurrent fever: relapsing fever

recurrent

 [re-kur´ent]
returning after a remission; reappearing.
recurrent fever
2. recurrent paroxysmal fever occurring in various diseases, including tularemia, meningococcemia, malaria, and rat-bite fever.

re·lap·sing fe·ver

an acute infectious disease caused by any one of a number of strains of Borrelia, marked by a number of febrile attacks lasting about 6 days and separated from each other by apyretic intervals of about the same length; the microorganism is found in the blood during the febrile periods but not during the intervals, the disappearance being associated with specific antibodies and previously evoked antibodies. There are two epidemiologic varieties: the louse-borne variety, occurring chiefly in Europe, northern Africa, and India, and caused by strains of B. recurrentis; and the tick-borne variety, occurring in Africa, Asia, and North and South America, caused by various species, each of which is transmitted by a different species of the soft tick, Ornithodoros.

recurrent fever

recurrent fever

recurrent

characterized by recurrence at intervals of weeks or months.

recurrent airway obstruction
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease of horses when the disease recurs after remissions when the patient is in a dust-free environment.
recurrent fever
relapsing fever.
recurrent impaction colic
form of the disease likely to occur in equine patients which are overfed by indulgent owners; a common problem in American miniature horses.
recurrent iridocyclitis
see periodic ophthalmia.
recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis
see roaring, laryngeal hemiplegia.
recurrent mastitis
clinical mastitis recurring in the same quarter due usually to residual foci of infection in tissue where udder infusion therapy does not penetrate; caused usually by infection with coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus.
recurrent tetany
see Scottie cramp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Back pain associated with recurrent fever, bladder dysfunction, and paraparesis should be investigated immediately using magnetic resonance imaging of the spine.
Recurrent fevers of decreasing intensity, followed by remissions at 1-week intervals, were observed in all patients for up to 3 months.
The hyperimmunoglobulinemia-D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is an autosomal, recessive, inherited, autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by recurrent fever attacks, abdominal pain, lymphadenopathy, skin lesions and joint involvement.
She had a long history of recurrent fever and cough.
quintana infections most frequently cause recurrent fever and pretibial pain (trench fever), endocarditis, and bacillary angiomatosis (2).
After she received antimicrobial agents, her symptoms initially improved, but in September 2005, 1 week after returning to the United Kingdom, she visited her general practitioner with recurrent fever and increasingly painful cervical lymphadenopathy.
On July 2004, a previously healthy 44-year-old man who lived in Gabon was admitted to the outpatient clinic of the university hospital in Udine, Italy, with a 6-month history of recurrent fever, headache, fatigue, weight loss, leg paresthesias, gait difficulties, and daytime somnolence.
Although the patient had a clinical course of recurrent fever, she was otherwise stable, and we therefore decided to discontinue cefuroxime on day 9.
Other symptoms included recurrent fevers, myalgias, transient and migratory arthritis, elevated C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and aseptic meningitis requiring hospitalization.
Periodic Fever Syndromes are a group of autoinflammatory diseases that cause disabling and recurrent fevers, which may be accompanied by joint pain and swelling, muscle pain and skin rashes, with complications that can be life-threatening.
He suffered from recurrent fevers and an array of health problems, but he stopped at nothing in the quest to cure his many ills.
Soon afterwards, the patient was readmitted with recurrent fevers and chest pain.

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