recurrence risk


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Related to recurrence risk: Relative risk

re·cur·rence risk

risk that a disease will occur elsewhere in a pedigree, given that at least one member of the pedigree (the proband) exhibits the disease.

recurrence risk

the chance that a disease found in one member of a proband will appear in other members of the same pedigree.

re·cur·rence risk

(rĕ-kŭr'ĕns risk)
Chance or possibility that a disease will occur elsewhere in a pedigree, given that at least one member of the pedigree (the proband) exhibits the disease.

recurrence

the return of clinical signs soon after a remission.

recurrence risk
in genetics the probability of a particular defect occurring again if the type of mating which produced it is repeated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Frequencies and percentages were computed for categorical variables such as gestational age, mode of delivery, risk factors of perinatal deaths in preceding pregnancy, risk factor of perinatal deaths in present pregnancy and recurrence risk.
We present the results of the cross-country growth regressions in Table 2 for the baseline model and in Table 3 for the model with the alternative definition of conflict recurrence risk, which is discussed in detail in assessing the robustness of the results.
4 GBq) according to their ATA recurrence risk stratification [sup][6] within 3 months after surgery; they underwent levothyroxine (LT4) withdrawal or no replacement treatment and a low-iodine diet for at least 2-6 weeks when serum TSH levels were >30 [micro]IU/ml.
discussion of recurrence risk and risk reduction for the couple and close family.
The new tool--called the Recurrence Risk Estimator at 90 Days score (RRE-90 score)--is based on a calculation involving risk factors that can be identified in the emergency room, according to a report published Jan.
The only significant predictor of increased recurrence risk was prostatic involvement.
An ongoing randomised controlled trial is examining whether or not the increased local recurrence risk of focally positive or close margins can be counterbalanced by increasing the boost dose, since further re-excision surgery is often technically difficult and it is seldom that any residual tumour is found in the re-excision specimen.
Taxane-based therapy in women younger than age 50 conferred a 16% reduction in recurrence risk, compared with anthracycline-based regimens, and a 14% reduction in breast cancer mortality through the first 4 years of follow-up.
Steps down the slippery slope to adoption without proper demonstration of utility can already be seen with tests purporting to identify those individuals of sufficiently low recurrence risk that particular adjuvant therapies (predominantly chemotherapy) may be avoided completely.
The treatment begins after final pathologic evaluation of margins, lymph nodes and other features that have an impact on recurrence risk.