recreation

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recreation

(rĕk-rē-ā′shŭn)
Participation in any endeavor that is entertaining, relaxing, or refreshing. Recreational activities may be personal or private (e.g., reading, painting), social (e.g., team sports or dance), physical (e.g., hunting), or mental (e.g., meditating or praying); they may be active or passive. Many recreational activities combine more than one of these elements.
References in classic literature ?
But, after all this is said, the time when I get the most solid rest and recreation is when I can be at Tuskegee, and, after our evening meal is over, can sit down, as is our custom, with my wife and Portia and Baker and Davidson, my three children, and read a story, or each take turns in telling a story.
But is war an art so easily acquired that a man may be a warrior who is also a husbandman, or shoemaker, or other artisan; although no one in the world would be a good dice or draught player who merely took up the game as a recreation, and had not from his earliest years devoted himself to this and nothing else?
Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), the lead Democrat on the Senate Small Business & Entrepreneurship Committee (SBC), applauded outdoor recreations significant economic contributions following the release today of the Outdoor Industry Associations (OIA) Outdoor Recreation Economy report.
The OIA report proves what we know: that outdoor recreation is one of the most powerful economic sectors in the country, said Shaheen.
Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced that the Federal Recreation Council will work with the Commerce Departments Bureau of Economic Analysis to assess the economic contributions of the outdoor recreation industry.
4) Gunther Barth depicts such commercial recreations as the defining institutions of the emerging modern city during the nineteenth century.
Among their projects, these groups furnished sociability for their members and organized fund-raising recreations that welcomed outsiders.
This paper addresses three common claims about the modernization of leisure, that: (1) organized pastimes replaced informal and spontaneous recreation; (2) commercial entertainment, especially spectacles such as movies and professional sports, replaced self-generated and active leisure; and (3) private diversions replaced collective recreation.