recovery heart rate

recovery heart rate

The heart rate measured at a fixed (”reference”) period—usually for one minute—after ending intense exercise. As a rule, the greater the drop in heart rate after exercise during the reference period, the better the shape the heart is in. Heart rates that drop by 12 bpm or less one minute after ending exercise have an increased risk of death.
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Table 1 shows the results of analysis of mean recovery heart rate using repeated measures ANOVA during protocol I (non-occlusion) in control and experimental groups.
(11) The drop in heart rate after cessation of exercise during various time intervals is the Recovery Heart rate. The time it takes for the heart rate to return to the baseline value improves with training.
As an example, an analysis of the training and its effectives in terms of physical conditioning can be obtained by evaluating the athletes' maximum heart rate (HR max), and recovery heart rate ([HR.sub.rec]) in addition to the assessment of different metabolic variables (3.12,15).
c) Recovery heart rate after exercise with natural watermelon or L-citrulline enriched watermelon juice was significantly reduced compared to placebo;
One-minute postexercise HRR is the most commonly used methodology to assess recovery heart rate in children [1-3, 6, 8].
Recovery heart rate and rest duration were recorded at the end of each rest period.
But maybe it's true, because a shorter time (~1 min) between resistance-training sets, as determined by recovery heart rate, resulted in higher post-session testosterones and twice the strength gains compared with the usual recovery time (2 min) in a controlled trial with 21 men training 3 times per week over 7 wk (Piirainen).
An analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to assess difference between protocols (stroke rate, distance per stroke, swim velocity, stroke index, 1-minute recovery heart rate, peak heart rate, and rate of decline).
Recovery heart rate should not drop below 55 percent to 60 percent MHR.
Cardiovascular fitness was estimated using participants' recovery heart rate. The test chosen was the submax YMCA 3-Minute Step Test (Golding, Myers, & Sinning, 1989), which requires participants to step onto a 12-inch high platform for 3 minutes at a rate of 24 steps per minute.
In addition, the heart rate monitor provides specific feedback about the principles of exercise such as resting heart rate, exercise heart rate, recovery heart rate, and target heart rate zone.
This is your Tecumseh 30-second recovery heart rate. Multiply it by two for your rate per minute.