recontamination


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recontamination

(rē″kŏn-tăm″ĭ-nā′shŭn)
The contamination of a recently disinfected or sterilized instrument before its use in patient care. It may result from inadequate packaging or mishandling of instruments after they have been rid of microorganisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The environmental sterilisation process is completely automated requiring no manual intervention from operators -- greatly decreasing risk of system recontamination.
Good microbiological principles like hazard analysis critical control points, has been employed by animal protein producer industry to reduce incidence of Salmonella recontamination in rendering plants since 1995 (Hofacre et al., 2001).
The primary goal of this procedure is to approach diseased tissue, remove it, and prevent recontamination of the periradicular region.
The canal is filled with a rubberlike substance called gutta--percha or another material to prevent recontamination of the tooth.
The mean values significantly differed (p[less than or equal to]0.05) indicating the recontamination at the consumer unit taps.
Apart from high efficiency, simple and economical recollection cannot be overlooked as well, in view of recontamination through introduction of nanohazard after treatment.
Our therapy may have failed due to constant recontamination and the inability to eliminate the effects of clostridial cytotoxins.
Then they examined the antimicrobial efficacy of fermented spice, sodium lactate and lauric arginate against a recontamination of the products with Lactobacillus curvatus and Listeria innocua at 6 C.
The health messaging included training on proper filter use, as well as promotion of safe water storage to prevent recontamination, and handwashing with soap and filtered water.
Failure to enforce cleanup could produce significant problems for areas the EPA calls "early action sites"--places that need to be cleaned first in order to prevent recontamination either closer to the shore or further downstream.
The main reason for root canal failure is persistent microorganisms that remain after therapy or recontamination of canal system because of inadequate seal.6,7
Chlorination effectively and affordably disinfects water and protects against recontamination. Because water quality might deteriorate after chlorination (2), during cholera outbreaks WHO recommends a minimum free chlorine residual of 2.0 mg/L at the point-of-filling for tanker trucks, 1.0 mg/L for standpipes and wells, and 0.2-0.5 mg/L at point-of-use (3).