recombine


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recombine

(rē′kəm-bīn′)
v. recom·bined, recom·bining, recom·bines
v.intr.
Genetics To undergo or cause recombination; form new combinations.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The process builds on EDI's layer multiplication technique which divides and recombines multilayer extrudate many times to produce films with many - more than 100 is possible - micro layers.
In the bird's built-in compass, when the "radical pairs" recombine, their nicely-aligned spins trigger a biochemical reaction.
These "quadrants of change"--political, economic, demographic and technological--will no doubt combine and recombine in ways that place the communicator and communication in increasingly critical roles.
At least that's the lasting impression left by Goldfish Memory, writer-director Liz Gill's cheery, brisk, and lively romantic comedy in which a group of amiable interconnected couples hook up, part, and recombine in ways that suggest La Ronde lite.
"In contrast to live attenuated vaccines, only a small portion of the genetic material will be used, therefore there is no risk that the vaccine could mutate or combine with naturally occurring influenza viruses to produce new strains, or recombine with human influenza strains which would have devastating global consequences."
However, many file-splitters require that both the sender and the recipient have the application so the received files can recombine the various chunks when they arrive at their destination.
The imperatives of academic promotion aside, the author might have been better advised not to recombine these pieces into a monograph, since the sum of the book amounts to distinctly less than the whole of its parts.
Such a source operates by tunneling a single electron and hole onto a QD where they recombine to produce a single photon.
To recombine the beams and recreate the message you would need to detect the arrival time of the photons extremely accurately to identify pairs of photons split by the sender.
The molecule may then break into smaller pieces or recombine into different configurations.
Dutch scientists have found, in a sophisticated computer simulation of the human digestive system, that ARM genes in genetically engineered food can recombine with bacteria already present in the human gut to give rise to new bacterial strains.
"With the Delitto Perfetto method, oligonucleotides containing the desired mutation are directly transformed into yeast, where they recombine directly with the genomic target."