recombination

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recombination

 [re″kom-bĭ-na´shun]
1. the reunion, in the same or different arrangement, of formerly united elements that have been separated.
2. in genetics, the process that creates new combinations of genes by shuffling the linear order of the DNA, such as occurs naturally by crossing over of homologous chromosomes during meiosis or of homologous DNA sequences in somatic cells during mitosis, or occurs in vitro when DNA or RNA is manipulated for genetic engineering.
bacterial recombination in bacterial genetics, the process of producing a new gene by any of several processes, e.g., the sexual union of two parents, molecular crossing over between two DNA chains, or transformation.

re·com·bi·na·tion

(rē-kom'bi-nā'shŭn),
1. The process of reuniting parts that had become separated.
See also: recombinant.
2. The reversal of coupling phase in meiosis as gauged by the resulting phenotype.
See also: recombinant.
3. The formation of new combinations of genes.

recombination

/re·com·bi·na·tion/ (re″kom-bĭ-na´shun)
1. the reunion, in the same or different arrangement, of formerly united elements that have been separated.
2. in genetics, the process that creates new combinations of genes by shuffling the linear order of the DNA.

recombination

(rē′kŏm-bə-nā′shən)
n.
The natural or artificial rearrangement of genetic material in living organisms or viruses, especially the creation in offspring of sexually reproducing parents of new combinations of genes through the process of crossing over during meiosis.

recombination

[rē′kombinā′shən]
Etymology: L, re + combinare
1 the formation of new arrangements of genes within the chromosomes as a result of independent assortment of unlinked genes, crossing over of linked genes, or intracistronic crossing over of nucleotides. See also recombinant DNA.
2 the coupling of oppositely charged ions liberated by ionizing radiation. Ionic recombination lowers the total number of charges collected by a dosimeter, thus causing the radiation dose to be underestimated. A technique for determining the magnitude of ionic recombination is routinely applied in accurate dosimetry.

re·com·bi·na·tion

(rē-kom'bi-nā'shŭn)
1. The process of reuniting of parts that had become separated.
2. The reversal of coupling phase in meiosis as gauged by the resulting phenotype.
See also: recombinant

recombination

The formation in offspring of a combination of two or more genes that differs from the arrangement of these genes in either parent. This is the result of the exchange of segments of DNA during the germ cell divisions that resulted in the formation of paternal sperms and maternal ova.
Recombinationclick for a larger image
Fig. 266 Recombination . The rearrangement of genes during meiosis.

recombination

  1. a rearrangement of genes during MEIOSIS so that a GAMETE contains a haploid GENOTYPE with a new gene combination. Recombination can occur by INDEPENDENT ASSORTMENT of genes on different chromosomes, but the term is used normally to refer to genes linked on the same chromosome where recombination is achieved by CROSSING OVER. See Fig. 266 .
  2. any exchange between DNA molecules or integration of one DNA molecule into another.

recombination

the reunion, in the same or different arrangement, of formerly united elements that have been separated; in genetics, the formation of new gene combinations due to crossing over by homologous chromosomes. Recombination occurs between viruses such as influenza or bluetongue which have segmented genomes. Called also reassortment.

recombination frequency
the frequency of exchange between two genes on the same chromosome.
References in periodicals archive ?
The potential role of genetic recombination in the evolution of new strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV).
Full-length human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genomes from subtype C infected seroconverters in India, with evidence of intersubtype recombination.
Automated phylogenetic detection of recombination using a genetic algorithm.
Recombination Events between 5'-UTR, VP1, and 3CD Genome Regions
Our goal was to sequence 3 genomic regions for each analyzed strain to determine definitively whether recombination events could represent a driving force for the evolution of rhinoviruses in their natural environment.
The differential cosegregations between these virus strains suggested recombination events.
Bootscanning analysis (Figure 3, panel A) enabled mapping of the recombination site within the 5.
These viruses show no evidence of recombination with other HEV-C strains and, similar to EV-104, do not grow in cell culture (29).
Finally, we demonstrated that rhinovirus evolves by recombination in its natural host.
We have shown that recombination also contributes to rhinovirus evolution in its natural environment.