recombination


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recombination

 [re″kom-bĭ-na´shun]
1. the reunion, in the same or different arrangement, of formerly united elements that have been separated.
2. in genetics, the process that creates new combinations of genes by shuffling the linear order of the DNA, such as occurs naturally by crossing over of homologous chromosomes during meiosis or of homologous DNA sequences in somatic cells during mitosis, or occurs in vitro when DNA or RNA is manipulated for genetic engineering.
bacterial recombination in bacterial genetics, the process of producing a new gene by any of several processes, e.g., the sexual union of two parents, molecular crossing over between two DNA chains, or transformation.

re·com·bi·na·tion

(rē-kom'bi-nā'shŭn),
1. The process of reuniting parts that had become separated.
See also: recombinant.
2. The reversal of coupling phase in meiosis as gauged by the resulting phenotype.
See also: recombinant.
3. The formation of new combinations of genes.

recombination

/re·com·bi·na·tion/ (re″kom-bĭ-na´shun)
1. the reunion, in the same or different arrangement, of formerly united elements that have been separated.
2. in genetics, the process that creates new combinations of genes by shuffling the linear order of the DNA.

recombination

(rē′kŏm-bə-nā′shən)
n.
The natural or artificial rearrangement of genetic material in living organisms or viruses, especially the creation in offspring of sexually reproducing parents of new combinations of genes through the process of crossing over during meiosis.

recombination

[rē′kombinā′shən]
Etymology: L, re + combinare
1 the formation of new arrangements of genes within the chromosomes as a result of independent assortment of unlinked genes, crossing over of linked genes, or intracistronic crossing over of nucleotides. See also recombinant DNA.
2 the coupling of oppositely charged ions liberated by ionizing radiation. Ionic recombination lowers the total number of charges collected by a dosimeter, thus causing the radiation dose to be underestimated. A technique for determining the magnitude of ionic recombination is routinely applied in accurate dosimetry.

re·com·bi·na·tion

(rē-kom'bi-nā'shŭn)
1. The process of reuniting of parts that had become separated.
2. The reversal of coupling phase in meiosis as gauged by the resulting phenotype.
See also: recombinant

recombination

The formation in offspring of a combination of two or more genes that differs from the arrangement of these genes in either parent. This is the result of the exchange of segments of DNA during the germ cell divisions that resulted in the formation of paternal sperms and maternal ova.
Recombinationclick for a larger image
Fig. 266 Recombination . The rearrangement of genes during meiosis.

recombination

  1. a rearrangement of genes during MEIOSIS so that a GAMETE contains a haploid GENOTYPE with a new gene combination. Recombination can occur by INDEPENDENT ASSORTMENT of genes on different chromosomes, but the term is used normally to refer to genes linked on the same chromosome where recombination is achieved by CROSSING OVER. See Fig. 266 .
  2. any exchange between DNA molecules or integration of one DNA molecule into another.

recombination

the reunion, in the same or different arrangement, of formerly united elements that have been separated; in genetics, the formation of new gene combinations due to crossing over by homologous chromosomes. Recombination occurs between viruses such as influenza or bluetongue which have segmented genomes. Called also reassortment.

recombination frequency
the frequency of exchange between two genes on the same chromosome.
References in periodicals archive ?
These viruses might be targets of secondary mutation and recombination events.
A variant of a protein called PRDM9 is responsible for creating the extra recombination hot spots, the team shows.
Simon Myers added, "More than half of African Americans carry a version of the biological machinery for recombination that is different than Europeans.
This test indicated that of the overall average recombination frequency of 4.
In comparison to type 1 fimbrial system, which exhibits a simple ON/OFF phenomena of PV, site-specific recombination phenomena in Salmonella flagella results in a more complex ON/OFF, ON/OFF PV.
To identify the potential recombination donor, we first built a pseudoreference genome of strain PF-10.
A possible explanation of these results could be given assuming that the first stage of the photocurrent decay is dominated by band to band recombination processes, whereas in the second stage, the photocurrent decay is additionally affected by trap assisted recombination.
Many of the new recombination hot spots fall within transposons-mobile pieces of DNA often called "jumping genes"--that don't have obvious places for PRDM9 to grab.
While recombination has been recognised as a potential risk associated with live virus vaccines for many years, the likelihood of it happening in viruses like this in the field has been thought to be so low that it was considered to be very unlikely to lead to significant problems," he said.
For the first time, we were able to generate an individual recombination map and mutation rate for each of several sperm from one person," said study co-author Barry Behr, PhD, HCLD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology and director of Stanford's in vitro fertilization laboratory.
Homologous recombination is a type of genetic recombination where two molecules of DNA are exchanged.
This required isolation and genetic mapping of mutants that could not grow without methionine, leading to an interest in the mechanism of recombination, the process that ensures that new combinations of genetic variants are transmitted from one generation to the next.

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