recognition

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recognition

 [rek″og-nish´un]
1. the act of recognizing (seeing something as familiar).
2. the state of being seen as familiar.
3. the interaction of immunologically competent cells with antigen that begins with the binding of the antigen to specific antigen receptors on B and T lymphocytes and results in an immune response directed against the antigen. Called also antigen recognition.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

recognition

(rĕk′əg-nĭsh′ən)
n.
Biology The ability of one molecule to attach itself to another molecule having a complementary shape, as in enzyme-substrate and antibody-antigen interactions.

re·cog′ni·to′ry (rĭ-kŏg′nĭ-tôr′ē), re·cog′ni·tive (-tĭv) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

recognition

Pharmacology See Drug recognition Substance abuse See Drug recognition Vox populi The state or quality of being recognized or acknowledged. See Continuous speech recognition, Intelligent character recognition, Kin recognition, OCR, Open-set speech recognition, Speech recognition.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

recognition

The process of binding of an antigen to a specific receptor on a cell of the immune system.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Mills (2009) Recognitive views of social justice and deficit models of social justice are evident in the comments of PSTs from both cohorts.
More importantly, this should be preceded by adopting an inclusive framework that allows us to work toward recognitive justice that balances freedom of migration with recognition and full membership in Canada (Guo 2010).
In addition to the structured aspects of Small Acts that fostered being noticed, Michael was afforded additional recognitive opportunities because of the proximity within which he and his interviewee lived.
Most useful is the detailed analysis offered by Heikki Ikaheimo and Arto Laitinen, 'Analyzing recognition: identification, acknowledgment and recognitive attitudes towards persons', in Recognition and Power (eds.) Bert van den Brink and David Owen, (Cambridge: Cambridge U.P.
(38) The locus classicus of Hegel's socially recognitive account of the mind is to be found in the famous "master-slave" dialectic in G.
The implications of this critical reappraisal are also clear to Luke: "There is a unanimity of voice on the need for a curriculum politics rebuilt around issues of equity, recognitive and redistributive social justice (Fraser 1996), and democratic education" (p.
Haines does not attempt to clarify what sense of the term "spirit" he has in mind (it cannot simply be "thumos," as Haines himself seems to realize, since the thumos is recognized everywhere in Homer to be not the whole self but merely a component of it); if it is something like "Hegelian spirit," (as his many references to the "recognitive" character of Homeric selves may suggest), then our two notions of what it is to be a Homeric self are really quite distinct (see note 22 below).
This approach would mimic the "lock-and-key" recognitive interaction capability of biomolecules like those found in DNA.
For their part, such agents would be capable of having subjective purposes or intentions only because they belonged to both the organic realm, with its internal teleology, and that "second nature" of objectified spirit, those recognitive and normative practices of a distinctively human form of sociality allowing intentional lives, on the other.
As Ladelle McWhorter has written in a moving account of her personal encounter with Foucault's work: "Reading Foucault's text was not a cognitive act so much as it was a recognitive act .
In particular, it is argued that a distributive "social justice" discourse is inconsistent with the recognitive justice demands of Maori as tangata whenua.