reclusive

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reclusive

(rĭ-klo͞o′sĭv, -zĭv)
adj.
Seeking or preferring seclusion or isolation.

re·clu′sive·ly adv.
re·clu′sive·ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the past, critics linked such sexual reclusiveness to a traditional cultural conditioning that required the young courting male (at least temporarily) to put "his sexuality under shackles" (Renner 261-62).
For a tiny minority of conspiracy-theorists, meanwhile, his reclusiveness had something to do with the event that 'never took place' - the moon landing; for them, the grainy footage was something carefully 'manipulated' in Nevada desert and millions who viewed it live on TV - when TV was a form of luxury to many at that time - were, simply, taken for a ride by NASA with the blessings of the US government!
"I think his genius was in his reclusiveness," said Brinkley.
In the early 1990s, Scarbrough discovered, via Burton Watson's 1962 translation, the poems of the eighth-century Chinese poet Han-shan, noted for his reclusiveness and eccentricity.
"In an environment marked by a great many challenges, the Organization is called upon today, more than ever before, to respond favorably to the aspirations of Muslim peoples for further solidarity and human and sustainable development, to support programs and projects designed to combat the illiteracy, ignorance and reclusiveness affecting large segments of our societies, and to seek to strengthen cooperation between Member States in the areas of science, technology and information." He added that new, effective approaches should be adopted to keep pace with the rapid developments affecting the world in various fields, but more so in the areas of computer science and modern technology, given their close link to human, economic and cultural development.
Because of his perceived reclusiveness, some may be surprised that Professor Driscoll was a mentor.
Klein's literary achievement has sometimes been overshadowed by his reclusiveness and withdrawal from the literary world.
When Malick returned to action 20 years after "Days of Heaven" (1978) with "The Thin Red Line," his reputation had gone beyond cult to legend, doubtlessly due in no small measure to a reclusiveness that would make J.D.
He said: "I never felt that feeling of reclusiveness that I normally feel and we were able to go out and sample some of the local wares - and it's a beautiful place."
Perhaps this desire for innovation, amongst other possibilities, separates him from other children his own age besides his cousin Consuelo: "The boy's reclusiveness disturbed my uncle.
She remains silent, though visibly pregnant, and isolates herself behind the family's historic reclusiveness. Ian is sanguine despite his mother's secrecy; he, too, is embroiled in an adulterous romance and, without guilt, realizes that he now inhabits the role of the interlopers his father so resented.
A journalist recently wrote of Alan's "natural reticence which, in recent years, has verged on reclusiveness."