recluse

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recluse

(rĕk′lo͞os′, rĭ-klo͞os′)
n.
A person who withdraws from the world to live in seclusion and often in solitude.
adj. recluse (rĭ-klo͞os′, rĕk′lo͞os′)
Withdrawn from the world; reclusive.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A woman is recovering from several spider bites after she found nearly 50 brown recluse spiders in her apartment in Brentwood, Tennessee.
The pioneering work on late Roman religion by Peter Brown (the "holy man") stimulated medievalists to think about the roles played by recluses and hermits for local communities and the significance of solitary religious as emblems of authority or, conversely, as rejecters of ecclesiastical order.
The writer, they dubbed "the recluse in the rye", gave what was probably his longest-ever interview to a high school newspaper based near his home.
Second, Tao Qian is vaguely qualified as the ancestor of a whole class not mentioned elsewhere in Shipin: no other poet is listed as a descendant of Tao or labeled a recluse. Zhong typically links poets together by naming them, not by grouping them into schools or trends like this loose category of "recluse-poets." Moreover, the connections he does establish are based on style of writing and not of life.
We collected brown recluses from a barn in the Little Creek Nature Preserve near St.
In his laboratory, Sandidge tested 147 adult brown recluses, putting each into an enclosure with a live insect and a carcass of the same species and size.
The Myrour of Recluses, as its editorial title suggests, provides guidance for those undertaking an anchoritic life.
This essay analyzes the constitutive expressions embedded in ecclesiastic discourse regarding virginity, particularly those attributed to men who took an active part in writing the "rules" to be followed by recluses, in order to answer some important questions concerning the gender (re)construction of the medieval recluse.
One explanation for the peculiarly high political profile cut by recluses in this era was that early imperial procedures for recommending men for government office (prior to the later maturation of a written civil-service examination system) were based upon personal appraisals of individual character.
About a dozen species around the world switch from recluses to swarmers.
Gorham (1968) shades every county in Mississippi indicating that brown recluses are found throughout the state.