reciprocal

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reciprocal

(rĭ-sĭp′rə-kəl)
adj.
1. Physiology Of or relating to a neuromuscular phenomenon in which the excitation of one group of muscles is accompanied by the inhibition of another.
2. Genetics Of or designating a pair of crosses in which the male or female parent in one cross is of the same genotype or phenotype as the complementary female or male parent in the other cross.

re·cip′ro·cal′i·ty (-kăl′ĭ-tē), re·cip′ro·cal·ness (-kəl-nĭs) n.
re·cip′ro·cal·ly adv.

reciprocal

(rĭ-sĭp′rō-kăl) [L. reciprocus, alternate]
Interchangeable.
References in periodicals archive ?
The interpretation of our results led to a context-specific revision to Bandura's (1986) model of triadic reciprocality. That is, with regard to career planning and decision making, faith intersects environmental variables, personal attributes, and overt behaviors in ways that are unexpected and multidimensional.
The film's effect and meaning depend upon the narrative's reversing the direction of power that Jeff exerts, and thus leads the way to achieving the reciprocality involved in intersubjective relationships.
Gale Sigal describes the dialogue of lovers in the alba corpus in order to argue for the 'idyllic reciprocality' (p.
This chapter also discusses the nature of party--state relations in terms of "reciprocality", that is, the overlap of structures and personnel (pp.
Though not a dogmatic system builder like many nineteenth-century German theorists, Mathieu's "reciprocality" of the minor mode (borrowed from Levarie and Levy) recalls Arthur von Oettingen's "phonicity," Hugo Riemann's "undertone series," and the subsequent polarist schools, who were all under Hauptmann's influence.
Thus, we see some evidence for the existence of a virtuous circle of reciprocality between IGOs and peace.
The following three hypotheses each address the issues of the validity of cognitive theories of empowerment, LH and the reciprocality of empowerment, with each hypothesis referring to a different method used to compare empowered and LH persons.
In Figure 1 the relationship of work roles, capability, and commitment are presented as being interactive, reflecting Bandura's conceptualization of the triadic reciprocality, or reciprocal interactions between factors.
Accordingly, one assumption of this theory, as posited by Bandura (1986), is the idea of triadic reciprocality (See Figure 1).
The important issue here is reciprocality; both languages are involved without being in a classroom situation.
Bandura's social cognitive theory postulates that "human functioning is explained in terms of a model of triadic reciprocality in which behaviour, cognitive and other personal factors, and environmental events all operate as interacting determinants of each other" (p.
Another country specific factor, not directly linked to small countries, was that often neighbouring countries had political ambitions which prevented reciprocality of entry, or there were other interventionist government measures which shaped the industry structure.