recipient

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recipient

 [re-sip´e-ent]
one who receives, as a blood transfusion, or a tissue or organ graft.
universal recipient traditional name for a person thought to be able to receive blood of any “type” (see blood group) without agglutination of the donor cells. This refers to individuals of blood group AB; however, research and clinical experience have now demonstrated that antibodies may be present to cause serious reactions. Therefore, prior to a blood transfusion, any recipient must be checked for compatibility (see crossmatching).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·cip·i·ent

(rē-sip'ē-ĕnt),
One who receives, as in blood transfusion or tissue or organ transplant.
[L. recipiens, fr. recipio, to receive]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

recipient

(rĭ-sĭp′ē-ənt)
n.
One who receives blood, tissue, or an organ from a donor.
adj.
Functioning as a receiver; receptive.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

recipient

Managed care A person eligible for Medicaid benefits. See Beneficiary Transfusion medicine A Pt who receives a blood product. See Universal recipient Transplantation A Pt who has received a donated tissue or organ.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

be·ne·fi·ci·ar·y

(ben'ĕ-fish'ē-ar-ē)
A person with health care insurance coverage, usually through the Medicare program.
Synonym(s): insured, recipient.
[Med.L. beneficiarius, fr. beneficium, benefit]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Recipient

The person who receives the donated blood marrow.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

be·ne·fi·ci·ar·y

(ben'ĕ-fish'ē-ar-ē)
A person with health care insurance coverage, usually through the Medicare program.
Synonym(s): insured, recipient.
[Med.L. beneficiarius, fr. beneficium, benefit]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It is argued that passive recipiency only displays that the talk has been heard without actively showing what has been heard.
When we consider Chart 6 along with Chart 7, it appears that the improvement in Louisiana's trust fund reserve position after 1987 is substantially due to benefits restrictions that have reduced both the recipiency rate and the replacement rate.
families depend on income from welfare programs, providing updated data on measures of welfare recipiency, dependency, and predictors of welfare dependence developed for previous reports.
To Goodin, Schmidtz's presumed answer of "not much" is morally unacceptable and empirically indefensible given the actual facts of poverty and welfare recipiency. Not surprisingly, his moral argument is the stronger claim.
Welfare Recipiency and Welfare Recidivism: An Analysis of Short-Term Dynamics.
Bronars and Grogger (1994) used the twins-first methodology to examine the effects of both marital and nonmarital fertility shocks on a broad range of outcome variables, including labor force participation, earned income, poverty status, welfare recipiency, and high school graduation.
Finally, the sad truth of the matter is that not only is entry into college substantially affected by parental income, but that recipiency of a college degree is affected by parental income to an even larger extent, with those at the lower end of the socioeconomic ladder being the least likely to complete the requirements for a degree (Lewis, 1993; Manski, 1992).
While Chicago's public housing tenants have extraordinarily high rates of welfare recipiency (92 percent in Robert Taylor receive either public assistance or a benefit such as disability or Social Security), few of New York's tenants are on welfare.
Concentrations of "bad" neighbourhood characteristics--such as high unemployment and welfare recipiency, and low educational levels--have an external effect beyond the families concerned.
25-35 (discussing various explanations or theories of poverty and welfare recipiency).
Bean et al., Country-of-Origin, Type of Public Assistance and Patterns of Welfare Recipiency Among U.S.