recidivism

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recidivism

 [re-sid´ĭ-vizm]
a tendency to relapse into a previous condition, disease, or pattern of behavior, particularly a return to criminal behavior.

re·cid·i·vism

(rē-sid'i-vizm),
The tendency of a person toward recidivation.
[L. recidivus, recurring]

recidivism

/re·cid·i·vism/ (re-sid´ĭ-vizm) a tendency to relapse, particularly a return to criminal behavior.

recidivism (recid)

[risid′iviz′əm]
Etymology: L, recidivus, falling back
a tendency by an ill person to relapse or return to a hospital.

re·cid·i·vism

, recidivity (rĕ-sidi-vizm, -si-divi-tē)
A tendency toward recidivation.
[L. recidivus, recurring]

recidivism (rəsid´əviz´əm),

n 1. the tendency for an ill person to relapse or return to the hospital.
n 2. the return to a life of crime after a conviction and sentence.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of recidivistic firesetting behaviors was identified using information taken from the Juvenile Fire Risk Interview Form (Fineman, 1997b).
These include the implementation of highly successful Domestic Violence and Substance Abuse programs, as well as the coordinated use of numerous electronic monitoring technologies as a proven effective approach to reducing recidivistic behavior in low risk offenders.
As one commonly asserted justification for capital punishment is preventing recidivistic violence--including violence in prison--one would expect a history of prior felonies to be associated with a decreased likelihood of commutation.
46) According to the Court, some conduct can be defined as more reprehensible than other actions, particularly: (1) where physical harm results; (2) if the harm is economic, where it was suffered by a particularly vulnerable target; (3) where there is evidence that the defendant acted intentionally or with reckless disregard for the safety of others; or (4) where such conduct was recidivistic in nature.
Cognitive-behavioral programs have the potential to reduce the rate of recidivism in some inpatients with major mental illness and a history of recidivistic aggression, crime, or both, reported Dr.
Offenders, particularly recidivistic offenders, frequently demonstrate antisocial characteristics.
Also noteworthy is that drug abstinence treatment alone was found to do little to reduce recidivistic behavior among juvenile offenders.