recidivism


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recidivism

 [re-sid´ĭ-vizm]
a tendency to relapse into a previous condition, disease, or pattern of behavior, particularly a return to criminal behavior.

re·cid·i·vism

(rē-sid'i-vizm),
The tendency of a person toward recidivation.
[L. recidivus, recurring]

recidivism

/re·cid·i·vism/ (re-sid´ĭ-vizm) a tendency to relapse, particularly a return to criminal behavior.

recidivism (recid)

[risid′iviz′əm]
Etymology: L, recidivus, falling back
a tendency by an ill person to relapse or return to a hospital.

re·cid·i·vism

, recidivity (rĕ-sidi-vizm, -si-divi-tē)
A tendency toward recidivation.
[L. recidivus, recurring]

recidivism (rəsid´əviz´əm),

n 1. the tendency for an ill person to relapse or return to the hospital.
n 2. the return to a life of crime after a conviction and sentence.
References in periodicals archive ?
But punitive strategies have been not only largely ineffective in reducing recidivism but also wasteful and costly.
The relatively high recidivism rates observed among released prisoners have commonly been adduced as evidence of the ineffectiveness of the US prison systems.
Reducing recidivism is a massive undertaking, and it must be addressed as such.
NCCE understands that nothing works 100 percent of the time; however, it is committed to make the biggest impact on recidivism possible.
The practical problem for legislators, policymakers, and criminal justice administrators is to determine how to measure factors that impact recidivism and how to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention programs with juvenile recidivists.
7) This research revealed that family factors were described in many other studies as the best predictor of recidivism when compared to other factors such as socio-economic status, personal distress, and intellectual functioning.
Despite the overwhelming size of the correctional system in the United States, the high recidivism rates associated with this system, and stark differences across states' recidivism rates, relatively little work has examined the factors related to differences in recidivism rates across states.
However, the last issue, pertaining to the comparatively low rates of recidivism among juvenile sex offenders, is one that requires specific attention.
In Connecticut, for example, those released in 2007 showed a recidivism rate of 43.
Factors linked to an increased risk of sexual recidivism include:
Thirdly, the psychosocial factors that are associated with recidivism, and that usually appear consistently in diverse studies, are very similar to those that are associated with the onset of a criminal trajectory (Arce et al.
The result may well be many more attempted attacks by convicted sex offenders and therefore higher recidivism rates on the whole, even if every individual attack attempted becomes somewhat less likely to succeed.