recessive

(redirected from recessivity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

recessive

 [re-ses´iv]
1. tending to recede.
2. in genetics, incapable of expression unless the responsible allele is carried by both members of a set of homologous chromosomes. See also recessive gene.
3. an allele or trait that has this characteristic.

re·ces·sive

(rē-ses'iv),
1. Drawing away; receding.
2. In genetics, denoting a trait due to a particular allele or alleles at a single locus that does not manifest itself unless mutant alleles are present on both homologous chromosomes of a pair.

recessive

(rĭ-sĕs′ĭv)
adj.
1. Tending to go backward or recede.
2.
a. Genetics Of, relating to, or designating an allele that does not produce a characteristic effect when present with a dominant allele.
b. Of or relating to a trait that is expressed only when the determining allele is present in the homozygous condition.
n. Genetics
1. A recessive allele or trait.
2. An organism having a recessive trait.

re·ces′sive·ly adv.

recessive

Genetics A genetic trait that is not phenotypically expressed in a heterozygous or partially heterozygous cell, but rather only in a homozygous or hemizygous state. See Phenotype, Trait. Cf Dominant.

re·ces·sive

(rĕ-ses'iv)
1. Drawing away; receding.
2. genetics Denoting a trait due to a particular allele that does not manifest itself in the presence of other alleles that generate traits dominant to it.

recessive

Pertaining to an alternative form of a gene (ALLELE) that produces an effect only when carried by both members of the pair of homologous chromosomes (only when HOMOZYGOUS). People with heterozygous alleles for a condition are called carriers. A recessive gene has no effect in the presence of a DOMINANT allele either because of its inactivity or because of the absence of a product.

Recessive

Refers to an inherited characteristic or trait that is expressed only when two copies of the gene responsible for it are present.

re·ces·sive

(rĕ-ses'iv)
Drawing away; receding.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has not been ruled out that the rescue is due to sex limited (male) expression of the hybrid breakdown genes rather than to their recessivity per se.
With complete recessivity (d = 1), the heritability is expected to increase when the recessive allele is rare, and the absolute magnitude of this increase can approach 0.4 (fig.