recessive

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recessive

 [re-ses´iv]
1. tending to recede.
2. in genetics, incapable of expression unless the responsible allele is carried by both members of a set of homologous chromosomes. See also recessive gene.
3. an allele or trait that has this characteristic.

re·ces·sive

(rē-ses'iv),
1. Drawing away; receding.
2. In genetics, denoting a trait due to a particular allele or alleles at a single locus that does not manifest itself unless mutant alleles are present on both homologous chromosomes of a pair.

recessive

(rĭ-sĕs′ĭv)
adj.
1. Tending to go backward or recede.
2.
a. Genetics Of, relating to, or designating an allele that does not produce a characteristic effect when present with a dominant allele.
b. Of or relating to a trait that is expressed only when the determining allele is present in the homozygous condition.
n. Genetics
1. A recessive allele or trait.
2. An organism having a recessive trait.

re·ces′sive·ly adv.

recessive

Genetics A genetic trait that is not phenotypically expressed in a heterozygous or partially heterozygous cell, but rather only in a homozygous or hemizygous state. See Phenotype, Trait. Cf Dominant.

re·ces·sive

(rĕ-ses'iv)
1. Drawing away; receding.
2. genetics Denoting a trait due to a particular allele that does not manifest itself in the presence of other alleles that generate traits dominant to it.

recessive

Pertaining to an alternative form of a gene (ALLELE) that produces an effect only when carried by both members of the pair of homologous chromosomes (only when HOMOZYGOUS). People with heterozygous alleles for a condition are called carriers. A recessive gene has no effect in the presence of a DOMINANT allele either because of its inactivity or because of the absence of a product.

Recessive

Refers to an inherited characteristic or trait that is expressed only when two copies of the gene responsible for it are present.

re·ces·sive

(rĕ-ses'iv)
Drawing away; receding.
References in periodicals archive ?
It seems reasonable to expect that much of the genetic variation for major components of fitness and for morphological traits closely associated with body size will be caused by the segregation of rare partially recessive alleles that may be unconditionally deleterious.
(1986) and Lopez-Fanjul and Villaverde (1989) might be due to chance increases in the frequencies of rare partially recessive alleles.
Dominant beneficial alleles show the strongest associations between the locus and the background when the beneficial is common, while recessive beneficials show the strongest associations when the beneficial is rare [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED].
This results in a lower mutational load in a gametes than in A gametes, an effect that is intensified when either allele is a rare recessive. In this case, the recessive homozygote class is highly purged compared to the other homozygotes, and there are also large selective differences between the two homozygotes relative to the heterozygote at the special locus.