recession


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

recession

 [re-sesh´un]
the drawing away of a tissue or part from its normal position.
gingival recession the drawing back of the gingivae from the necks of the teeth, with exposure of root surfaces.

re·ces·sion

(rē-sesh'ŭn),
A withdrawal or retreating.
See also: retraction.
[L. recessio (see recessus)]

re·ces·sion

(rĕ-sesh'ŭn)
1. A withdrawal or retreating.
See also: retraction
2. Surgical operation in which an extaocular muscle is detached from the globe and reattached posteriorly.
3. Loss of gingiva on a tooth apically; measurement is made using a probe; findings are recorded as attachment loss.

recession

Surgical retroplacement of a part, especially the insertion of a muscle so as to weaken its action.

recession 

A surgical procedure used in strabismus in which an extraocular muscle is removed from its insertion and repositioned elsewhere on the globe, posteriorly to weaken it and anteriorly to strengthen it (called advancement procedure). See resection; strabismus surgery.

gin·gi·val re·ces·sion

(jinji-văl rĕ-seshŭn)
Apical migration of the gingiva along the tooth surface, with exposure of the tooth surface.
Synonym(s): gingival atrophy, gingival resorption.

recession (rēsesh´ən),

n a moving back or withdrawal.
recession, bone,
n apical progression of the level of the alveolar crest associated with inflammatory and dystrophic periodontal disease; a bone resorption process that results in decreased osseous support for the tooth.
recession, gingival,
n atrophy of the gingival margin associated with inflammation, apical migration (proliferation) of the epithelial attachment, and resorption of the alveolar crest.
recession, periimplant,
n the loss of gingival tissues around a dental implant.
References in periodicals archive ?
The size of a bubble represents the drop in GDP during the preceding recession.
And rising or falling demand is the trickiest aspect of planning for the next recession because economic disruptions relatively quickly push demand in the opposite direction of where it had been trending.
t] for recession periods in various specifications of Okun's law.
Even if it gives a positive reading, recession fears are likely to continue for a few months until the picture becomes clearer.
In the second specification, I wanted to capture the serial correlation nature of the recession variable by allowing the current state of the economy to impact the recession probability forecast.
State year-end balances continued to fall well after the end of the recession, and hit their lowest point on record in June 1992 at 0.
Fifty-seven percent of adults who have taken action because of the recession made changes in their overall spending habits, and 61 percent said they have cut back on entertainment expenses like dining out or travel.
Recession The relatively mild 1969 recession followed a lengthy
But beneath this superficial similarity, there are important differences between the recent recession and those of the past.
In a typical postwar business cycle, the unemployment rate starts leveling off about 14 months after the start of the recession (recessions typically last around 10 months), but it usually takes more than 30 months to return to pre-recession levels.
We cannot always control what will happen during a recession, but we can better equip ourselves to have power over what we can somewhat control: our educational attainment.