receptor site


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to receptor site: receptor protein

re·cep·tor site

the point of attachment to cell membranes for viruses, hormones, or other activators.

receptor site

The particular component of a cell surface that has the ability to react with certain molecules, e.g., proteins or a virus.
See also: site

receptor site

a point or structure in a cell at which combination with a drug or other agent results in a specific change in cell function.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fermented soy occupies the 3-beta adiol receptor site, which we know as ER-b, and provides the same protection.
Over a multi-year recovery period, the opioid receptor sites can become re- sensitized to the low levels of natural opioids produced in the body.
Local anesthetic action seems to be controlled by two factors: the size of the adsorbate molecule and some charge-related quality that reflects the ability to act at the receptor site. The first factor concerns the non-receptor specific actions, and the latter may come into play as more is discovered about specific sites of action.
The ligand part of the molecular package, called a quencher-tether-ligand (QTL), is the "key" that fits into a receptor site on a specific biological or chemical species.
Some medications with quite specific effects--beta-blockers, for example, which minimise stage fright without dulling the concentration that a musician will require to perform--are already available (their name is derived from the specific receptor site they block).
Normally if quinolinic acid is released in brief bursts, it excites the NMDA receptor site to an extent that is not harmful to cells.
When plant estrogens occupy a receptor site, there's no room in that site for dangerous estrogens--like those found in the environment--to occupy.
A male with low libido may have depressed testosterone, elevated estrogen, depressed luteinizing hormone (LH), elevated dihydrotestosterone creating androgen receptor site resistance, or elevated androstenedione competing with testosterone receptor sites.
One thought is that when a hypocretinergic neuron releases hypocretin, the neurotransmitter attaches to its receptor site on a nearby glutamatergic neuron.
The neurotransmitter then stimulates an adjacent cell by fitting into a "receptor site" on its surface, very much as a key fits into a lock.
Additionally, chronic stimulation at the receptor site is believed to be responsible for upregulation (an increase) in the number of receptors expressed at the cell surface.
These drugs block the effect of angiotensin II at the receptor site. They delay heart remodeling and reduce symptoms, and they have been shown to reduce hospitalizations and deaths.

Full browser ?