received pronunciation


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

received pronunciation

The standard accent of British English, which is typically spoken in the south of England. While RP is not intrinsically better than other regional accents, it is typically the accent native to, or adopted by, Britons with power, money, education and influence, a tendency that began in the early 20th century. It is the accent spoken or adopted by most doctors in the UK.
References in periodicals archive ?
'Ellis proposed the theoretical existence of two phenomena: first, the nationally recognizable written form of English (the standard literary English), and second, a "received pronunciation" of that form (standard spoken English)', as Crowley commented, for example, in 1989.(10) A.
Although received pronunciation was spoken by just three per cent of the population, it was recognised as the tongue of those belonging within the upper echelons of society.
"The Doctor is a scientist and an intellectual, and a lot of people seem to think you can only be those things if you speak with received pronunciation which, of course, is rubbish."
Again, Hodgdon asserts that Received Pronunciation `invalidates what might be called the sound of the other' (p.
One legacy of the prescriptive tradition is Received Pronunciation (RP), non-localized and standard, though permitting considerable variety.
Received pronunciation had been the broadcasting norm for decades, with cut-glass English being the acceptable voice of the BBc.
The pair of bowler-hatted vagabonds are traditionally played with Irish accents when Godot is performed in English but on this occasion we were treated to a bluff northern Estragon and a received pronunciation Vladimir which worked remarkably well when delivered by two fine actors.
The enthusiastic patter of a simple gardener is replaced by a calm more Received Pronunciation tone as we chat about how he first pitched the idea for his character to the BBC five years ago.
Paul also has a pop at the BBC, Whitehall mandarins and others who attempt to speak in the posh Received Pronunciation of public school English.
Full browser ?