recall

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Related to recalls: Food recalls

recall

 
1. (re-kawl´) to remember or recollect.
2. (re´kawl) the process of bringing information back into consciousness.

re·call

(rē'kawl),
The process of remembering thoughts, words, and actions of a past event in an attempt to recapture actual happenings.

recall

Medical devices
noun The retiring of a device from the medical marketplace or suspension of its approval pending investigation or addressing of a defect.

Medspeak-UK
verb To request—usually by letter—that a woman return for a repeat cervical screening test, which is done in 3- or 5-year cycles under the NHS Cervical Screening Programme.

Neurology
noun The process of bringing a memory into consciousness; the recollection of past facts, events, feeling; invoking the memory of experiences or learned information.

verb To remember experiences or learned information.

Public health
noun A public announcement by a manufacturer or producer of a particular product—e.g., motor vehicles, toys, drugs, medical devices, foods—asking the purchaser of a particular product or model to return the goods as they may have defects posing a health hazard; the collecting by a manufacturer of a product that has been deemed unsafe, or otherwise unsuitable, after being sold or available for sale to the public.

recall

Neurology nounpronounced ree CALL The process of bringing a memory into consciousness; the recollection of past facts, events, feelings; invoking of the memory of experiences or learned information verbpronounced ricall To remember experiences or learned information. See Class recall, Immediate recall, Memory Public health noun–pronounced REE call, drug recallA public announcement by a manufacturer or producer of a particular product–eg, motor vehicles, toys, drugs, medical devices, foods, asking the purchaser of a particular 'lot, ' or model to return the goods as they may have defects posing a health hazard.

re·call

(rē'kawl)
1. The process of remembering thoughts, words, and actions of a past event in an attempt to recapture actual happenings.
2. To remove a product (e.g., drug) from use due to possible safety issues with the product.
References in periodicals archive ?
FDA's recall authority and program launches you into a project of crisis management.
Drug recalls are common and are done by drug manufacturers--on their own or at the request of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)--to protect patients from potentially dangerous products.
Selective's system works to reach all current owners of insured vehicles with open recalls. As part of its safety management services, Selective's new Recall Alert System can identify and alert current owners of recalled vehicles within a week that the recall is added to the NHTSA system.
AGCS cited the example of defective airbags - one of the largest recalls to hit the automotive industry to date, which is expected to result in some 60 to 70 million units recalled worldwide across at least 19 manufacturers, with an estimated cost of close to $25 billion.
The Public Authority for Consumer Protection (PACP) is in the process of adding a new feature to its relaunched recall webpage - recall.pacp.gov.om - whereby a consumer can find out if a recall notice applies to his vehicle or not.
In part to address these circumstances, in January 2018, FDA announced draft guidance for strengthening public warnings and notifications of recalls. It was the first in a series of policy steps this past year to better arm consumers with information to protect themselves and their families.
That was just one of several recalls last year to generate panic -- and press.
The National Independent Automobile Dealers Association in September joined forces with the National Safety Council to support the council's Check To Protect campaign to reduce the number of vehicles with open recalls.
Roughly a third of product recalls are from companies with five or fewer employees.
The pace of defective products being recalled has increased so much that they are now a leading cause of liability loss for businesses globally.
According to United Fresh officials, the new resource provides a general overview and outline, explaining why it is critical for companies to have a recall plan; the basic components of a recall plan and response processes; how a recall plan differs from a food safety plan and traceability; and also offers additional recall-related resources.