rebuttal

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rebuttal

(ri-bŭt′ăl)
In law, evidence or testimony that contradicts or sheds doubt upon the assertions of the opposing party in a dispute.
rebut (ri-bŭt′)
References in periodicals archive ?
After the defence counsel concluded the final arguments, prosecutor Abbasi requested the court to allow him to rebut the arguments of the defence counsel.
Rebut was also the recipient of Fusion Power Associates 1989 Leadership Award.
wrong if interpreted as holding that a defendant may be able to rebut
The best way to rebut these arguments and withstand the scrutiny, then, is to provide the appropriate amount of management attention to a recycling program.
Gagnon repeatedly strives to rebut arguments that Via never made in the first place.
While the IRS will want to limit the value to thrift store values, the courts have allowed taxpayers to rebut that assumption and prevail.
The appeals court that the allegations in the complaint were insufficient to rebut the presumption that prison officials' decisions regarding the inmate's safety at the time of his death were of the type that could be said to be grounded in Bureau of Prisons (BOP) policy, and thus the FTCA's discretionary function exception shielded the United States from liability for the inmate's death.
It also would eliminate provisions allowing an entity to rebut the presumption that contracts with the option of settling in either cash or stock will be settled in stock and require that shares that will be issued upon conversion of a mandatorily convertible security be included in the weighted-average number of ordinary shares outstanding used in computing basic earnings per share from the date that conversion becomes mandatory.
That child could have lead poisoning and the landlord will be presumed liable--that's a presumption a landlord can't rebut.
An Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) found that there was sufficient evidence to rebut the "found dead" presumption and dismiss the dependents' claim.
Top government spokesman Yasuo Fukuda responded the following day, saying, ''The trade report contains inaccurate descriptions on Japan,'' and that the government will soon rebut these allegations.