rebound phenomenon


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Related to rebound phenomenon: pronator drift

re·bound phe·nom·e·non

1. Synonym(s): Stewart-Holmes sign
2. generally, any phenomenon in which a variable that has been displaced from its normal state by a disturbing influence temporarily deviates from normal in the opposite direction when the disturbing influence is suddenly removed, before finally stabilizing at its normal state, that is, a phenomenon involving undershoot; for example, the subsequent hypoglycemia that may follow injection of glucose, because the initial hyperglycemia caused excessive secretion of insulin.

re·bound phe·nom·e·non

(rē'bownd fĕ-nom'ĕ-non)
1. Synonym(s): Stewart-Holmes sign.
2. Generally, any phenomenon in which a variable that has been displaced from its normal state by a disturbing influence temporarily deviates from normal in the opposite direction when the disturbing influence is suddenly removed, before finally stabilizing at its normal state.

rebound phenomenon

The inability to prevent large over-shoot movements of a limb when resistance to strong muscle contraction is suddenly removed. This is a sign of cerebellar dysfunction.

Stewart,

Thomas Grainger, English neurologist, 1877-1957.
Stewart-Holmes sign - in cerebellar disease, the inability to check a movement when passive resistance is suddenly released. Synonym(s): rebound phenomenon
References in periodicals archive ?
The rebound phenomenon after aspirin cessation: The biochemical evidence.
Sharif reported that 60% goiters showing rebound phenomenon either due to raised lithium ratio in rabbits or due to marked iodine imbalance caused by sudden withdrawal of chronic lithium therapy (Sharif and Raza, 2006).
The main problem is what is known as a "rebound phenomenon," whereby, the symptoms that led to drug therapy, in the first place (for example, sadness or anxiety) temporarily become worse when trying to reduce or eliminate the drug use.
This rebound phenomenon occurs after 5-7 days of regular use.
This suppression-driven rebound phenomenon should concern those who conduct race relations education interventions--in that the situational context (of the race relations classroom) at least implicitly, if not explicitly, encourages participant (i.e., student) suppression of prejudicial stereotypes.
Thus, this PAI-1 increase may reflect a common, drug-independent reaction to thrombolytic infusion, which supports the hypothesis of an antifibrinolytic rebound phenomenon of the organism after thrombolytic therapy [18].
"The French, who recommend a ten-year fallow period, did a study that indicated a rebound phenomenon as much as ten times greater than before fumigation.
We believe that tapering is necessary because there appears to be a rebound phenomenon following the acute cessation of PPI therapy.
None of the patients who had been receiving corticosteroids showed any evidence of the rebound phenomenon characterized by worsening of lesions and facial swelling, which are frequently seen when steroids are withdrawn (Dermatology 203[1]:32-37, 2001).
Recent withdrawal of steroid therapy is a period of heightened risk due to a rebound phenomenon, he said.