reasonable care


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reasonable care

Etymology: L, rationalis
the degree of skill and knowledge used by a competent health practitioner in treating and caring for the sick and injured.

reasonable care

In law, the degree of care that an ordinarily prudent or reasonable person would exercise under the same or similar circumstances.
References in periodicals archive ?
57) Even though other New England states have demonstrated successful implementation of the reasonable care standard, there are still a few concerns that may plague Massachusetts landowners, such as how their homeowner's insurance will be affected by this new standard.
exercise reasonable care, is not fully aligned with the element of
Lastly, certain passages in the explanatory memorandum to the Bill may be seen as lowering the standard of reasonable care expected of a taxpayer.
The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) brought the prosecution against Cotterill, who denied failing to supervise the pool with reasonable care.
While some courts find having a written policy is reasonable care per se, Utah's courts have not so held, but one Utah judge called a written policy "a powerful indication that the employer is at least taking reasonable preventative measures.
Fortunately for grocers, they can adopt four informal and quite inexpensive practices that would help demonstrate reasonable care.
HOTEL PROTECTION MANAGEMENT: THE INNKEEPER'S GUIDE TO GUEST PROTECTION & REASONABLE CARE
16040 provides that the trustee must administer the trust with reasonable care, skill and caution under the then-prevailing circumstances that a prudent person acting in a like capacity would use in the conduct of an enterprise of like character and with like aims to accomplish the purposes of the trust as determined from the trust instrument.
The Court stated "In Alberta, the Act (Occupiers' Liability Act) does not make an occupier an insurer, but shifts the evidentiary burden to the occupier to show it exercised the degree of reasonable care called by the foreseeable risk sufficient to keep a visitor reasonably sale.
The council only has a duty of reasonable care in this case.
The revised ethics ruling also clarifies that disclosing confidential client information to a third-party service provider for the purpose of providing professional services to clients or for administrative support purposes would not be in violation of Rule 301, "Confidential Client Information"; however, the member would be required to enter into a contractual agreement with the third-party service provider to maintain the confidentiality of the client's information, and use reasonable care in determining that the third-party service provider has appropriate procedures in place to prevent the unauthorized release of confidential client information.
Typical is a federal court's holding that an underwriter conducting due diligence must show that it "did not know, and in the exercise of reasonable care, could not have known, of [the] untruth or omission" of the investor disclosure in question (Software Toolworks Sec.