rear


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Related to rear: rear guard, rear its head

rear

(rîr)
n.
1. A hind part.
2. Informal The buttocks.
adj.
Of, at, or located in the rear.
References in classic literature ?
As he was approaching from the rear he found it but lightly guarded and what sentinels there were, were not upon the alert, and so it was an easy thing for him to enter after darkness had fallen and prowl about listening at the backs of tents, searching for some clew to the slayer of his mate.
Thousands of the elders, of what were then called the New States[*], broke up from the enjoyment of their hard-earned indulgences, and were to be seen leading long files of descendants, born and reared in the forests of Ohio and Kentucky, deeper into the land, in quest of that which might be termed, without the aid of poetry, their natural and more congenial atmosphere.
Taglat withdrew a few paces to the rear of the hut, gathered himself for the effort, ran quickly forward and leaped high into the air.
Don't buck, but rears. Got to ride him with a martingale.
Multitudes of drivers might howl in his rear, and passengers might load him with opprobrium, he would not awaken until some blue policeman turned red and began to frenziedly tear bridles and beat the soft noses of the responsible horses.
Stumbling along the tangled trail of those ahead a dozen heavily laden blacks who, from fatigue or sickness, had dropped behind were being prodded by the black soldiers of the rear guard, kicked when they fell, and then roughly jerked to their feet and hustled onward.
"The Greeks are interesting and extremely important because they reared such a vast number of great individuals.
Cedric readily assented to what she proposed, and Athelstane only added the condition, ``that they should travel in the rear of the whole party, where Wamba,'' he said, ``might attend them with his shield of boar's brawn.''
But, awkwardly enough, the guards now appeared at the rear of the temple, and there installed themselves, in readiness to prevent a surprise.
The captain of the company had been pacing excitedly to and fro in the rear. He coaxed in schoolmistress fashion, as to a congregation of boys with primers.
She had a good idea of what was coming, and the moment York took the rein off the terret in order to shorten it she took her opportunity and reared up so suddenly that York had his nose roughly hit and his hat knocked off; the groom was nearly thrown off his legs.
In this way, they hovered round him, feathering him with arrows, as he reared and plunged about, until he was bristled all over like a porcupine.