reality awareness

re·al·i·ty a·ware·ness

(rē-al'i-tē a-wār'nes),
The ability to distinguish external objects as being different from oneself.

re·al·i·ty a·ware·ness

(rē-al'i-tē ă-wār'nĕs)
The ability to distinguish external objects as being different from oneself.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1.) Chris Morris, "Virtual Reality Awareness Is High, But Will They Buy?" Fortune, last modified March 2016, fortune.com/2016/03/28/virtual-reality-awareness-is-high-but-will-they-buy.
These were: 1) Assertiveness and Positive Self-Concept (APSC, [alpha] = .74), 2) Impulse Control (IC, [alpha] = .72), 3) Positive Attitude about Life (PAL, [alpha] = .77), 4) Reality Awareness (RA, [alpha] = .71), and 5) Controlled Problem Solving (CPS, [alpha] = .71).
The important findings were that the Positive Attitude about Life dimension of EI was a consistently negative predictor of impression management behavior, whereas the Reality awareness dimension had a positive impact on three sub-scales of Impression Management.
However, Reality Awareness dimension of EI was found to be a positive predictor of two dimensions of Impression Management: Job Specific Impression Management and Supervisory Focused Impression Management.
Thus, overall, these results showed that Positive Attitude about Life dimension of EI was found be a significant negative predictor whereas Reality Awareness and Controlled Problem Solving were found to be the significant positive predictors of Impression Management beahvior.
A fascinating dialogue between the Poet and the Master of the Universe is interrupted by Airaina, a dancing fairy-like being who suffers from maternal rejection and a displaced reality awareness. A great Debate and Debacle ensue, ending with tinkles of fairy dust, perhaps a hint of laughter.
The transition included broken expectations when understanding that something was wrong with the fetus or the neonate, total confusion when confronting the fact that the neonate would die, reality awareness when facing the actuality of the neonate's dying and death, consciously leave-taking when encountering the dead infant, and elusive grief when adapting to the death of the infant.
Reality awareness. After receiving the information that the infant would die, the health care professionals counseled the women, explaining to them the dying procedure.
Referring to emotionally difficult situations, Noddings (1984) maintained that people do need someone who can comprehend their reality, feel what they are feeling, and care from the view of the "one-caring." When the health care professionals told the women how to take care of the infant during the dying process, the women developed a sense of reality awareness, and almost all of them wanted to hold their infant.
Five of the six women experienced reality awareness of the impending death and had the presence of mind to hold their infant in their arms while dying.