reading

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reading

 [rēd´ing]
understanding of written or printed symbols representing words.
lip reading (speech reading) understanding of speech through observation of the speaker's lip movements.

read·ing

(rēd'ing),
1. The perception and understanding of the meaning of visual symbols (for example, letters or words) by the scanning of writing or print with the eyes.
2. Any of several alternative ways of interpreting symbols, such as Braille or the close observation of a speaker's facial movements.

reading

/read·ing/ (rēd´ing) understanding of written or printed symbols representing words.
lip reading , speech reading understanding of speech through observation of the speaker's lip movements.

reading

Etymology: AS, raedan
the linear process in which the genetic information contained in a nucleotide sequence is decoded, as in the translation of the messenger RNA into a sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide.

read·ing

(rēd'ing)
1. The perception and understanding of the meaning of visual symbols (e.g., letters or words) by the scanning of writing or print with the eyes.
2. Any of several alternative ways of interpreting symbols, such as Braille or the close observation of a speaker's facial movements.

reading 

The act of viewing and interpreting letters, words, sentences, etc. It consists of a pattern of eye movements. The eyes proceed along a line in a series of step-like saccades, separated by fixation pauses during which information from the text is acquired. The amount of reading matter correctly identified during the fixation pause is called the span of recognition or the perceptual span. Most saccades are made from left to right, but some occur in the opposite direction (called regression) to return to text recently read but not yet fully perceived. At the end of the line the eyes make a return sweep to the next line of text (Fig. R3). See saccadic eye movement; developmental eye movement test.
Fig. R3 Schematic illustration of eye movements during readingenlarge picture
Fig. R3 Schematic illustration of eye movements during reading
References in classic literature ?
But he would not repeat the experiences of which I had been reading with rapture in his books.
It begets in those [95] who fall in with him at the right moment of their spiritual development, a habit of reading between the lines, a faith in the effect of concentration and collectedness of mind on the right appreciation of poetry, the expectation that what is really worth having in the poetic order will involve, on their part, a certain discipline of the temper not less than of the intellect.
Or in the small hours I might make a confidant of my father, and when I had finished reading he would say thoughtfully, 'That lassie is very natural.
That and the speedometer were both on my side of the cabin, and as I turned to take a reading from the former I could see Perry muttering.
As for the painful impression produced in Court by the readings from the letters and the Diary, it seemed to be impossible to increase it.
I drove home, selected and marked my first series of readings, and drove back to Montagu Square, with a dozen works in a carpet-bag, the like of which, I firmly believe, are not to be found in the literature of any other country in Europe.
But when he opened the door of the chart-room he saw his captain reading a book.
Pickwick himself wrote a pamphlet, containing ninety-six pages of very small print, and twenty-seven different readings of the inscription: that three old gentlemen cut off their eldest sons with a shilling a-piece for presuming to doubt the antiquity of the fragment; and that one enthusiastic individual cut himself off prematurely, in despair at being unable to fathom its meaning: that Mr.
Stelling was so broad-chested and resolute that he felt equal to anything; he would become celebrated by shaking the consciences of his hearers, and he would by and by edit a Greek play, and invent several new readings.
How did you like my reading of the character, gentlemen?
Is it possible, gentle sir, that the nauseous and idle reading of books of chivalry can have had such an effect on your worship as to upset your reason so that you fancy yourself enchanted, and the like, all as far from the truth as falsehood itself is?
Again, Tragedy like Epic poetry produces its effect even without action; it reveals its power by mere reading.