reader


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Related to reader: Reader's Digest

reader

An academic rank in the UK and certain Commonwealth (Australia, New Zealand) universities, which is hierarchically above senior lecturer and awarded to someone with a distinguished international reputation for original research and a track record for teaching excellence and service to the university. Readers are equivalent to professors in the US.

reader

Academic medicine An academician in the UK who is an expert in a specific area of medicine. See Lecturer Informatics A device that can access data from a machine-readable storage source–eg, a device that reads magnetic stripe cards. See OCR reader, Scanner.
References in periodicals archive ?
Identiv's smart card readers include a broad range of contact, contactless, and mobile smart card reader and terminal technology, digital identity and transaction platforms, and solutions that integrate physical and logical access control.
(http://googlereader.blogspot.com/) Google said it is cancelling Google Reader because of a decline in usage and a desire to focus on other products.
Now open the Reader archive you downloaded from Google with one of the tools mentioned in the previous point.
Nonetheless, the complaints poured in from "the field": the readers were too hard; they were too different; they didn't have the worksheets that teachers expected; they didn't have the comprehension questions that teachers needed.
Consultant Steve Sahlein almost started a brawl at a newsletter conference editors' session when he suggested that the job of an editor was to figure out what the readers of a newsletter wanted and give it to them rather than some "higher calling" determining what the readers "should know." I totally agree.
The important thing is that they somehow capture the essence of the article--and, of course, that they provide just enough detail to make the reader want to find out more.
The best-selling series has struck a chord with readers around the world and across cultures.
However, readers need to be prepared, particularly non-economists, to slog on through some dense material.
Our journey to broadening our reader and advertiser base began with research, lots of research.
Through her fiction, Butler exhorted readers to act rather than be acted upon, to cede power only to leaders wisely chosen, and to examine the origins of our ideas, so that we might not simply "think what we are told that we think."
In chapter 1, De La Torre discusses the social process of reading, defines key terms and concepts for his study, and demonstrates how sometimes modern readers have a tendency to impose meanings on ancient biblical texts that are anachronistic.