rationing


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Related to rationing: Office of War Information

rationing

Managed care The allocation or distribution of a scarce product, commodity or service. See Age-based rationing, Health care rationing, Oregon plan, Red-tape rationing.

ra·tion·ing

(rash'ŭn-ing)
Allotment or distribution of fixed portions.
[L. ratio, calculation]

rationing

Resource allocation in health care, esp. in managed health care systems.

rationing

See MEDICAL RATIONING.
References in periodicals archive ?
A sweet shop in Newcastle when rationing came to an end A Ministry of Food ration book
"They believe that, in our current difficult situation, rationing goods is not only irrational, but more open [competition] is necessary," Jahangiri said.
Dr Mark Porter, chairman of the BMA, said rationing of vital health care "not only causes delay and distress to patients, but can ends up costing the NHS more money in the long run."
Several restaurants in the city coped with the rationing by using disposable plates and cutlery.
The phenomenon of implicit rationing among nurses has only recently appeared in the literature.
Calasara clarified that not all service areas will be affected by water rationing. He said some parts of Jaro district will experience on-and-off low water pressure.
preauthorization for certain procedures are all forms of rationing. (9)
But there's plenty of anecdotal evidence of care rationing (see "What nurses are saying" ...
By far the biggest misconception regarding rationing is that it is always hated.
"It's a great tragedy that the food standards in the UK are worse now than they were during the rationing during the war.
"This has created a disorganized, illogical, and powerful form of rationing," she says.