ras oncogene


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ras oncogene

point mutations first described in rat sarcoma cells that can be shown to have transforming activity in culture as well as in tumorigenesis models in mice; the ras gene family is composed of three closely related genes on three different chromosomes; abnormalities have been identified in a variety of human tumors.

ras on·co·gene

(ras on'kō-jēn)
Point mutations first described in rat sarcoma cells that can be shown to have transforming activity in culture, as well as in tumorigenesis models in mice; the ras gene family is composed of three closely related genes on three different chromosomes; abnormalities have been identified in a variety of human tumors.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Kamata, "The superoxide-generating oxidase Nox1 is functionally required for Ras oncogene transformation," Cancer Research, vol.
26,27] Clinical studies reveal a low incidence of ras oncogenes in American men with prostate cancer,[30-34] whereas a Japanese study reported the presence of ras oncogenes in 25% of Japanese men diagnosed with prostate cancer.
Brown, a cholesterol researcher at the university of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, is to determine whether the link between cholesterol synthesis and the ras oncogene is "a mere evolutionary fact without deeper significance" or nature's way of activating oncogenes.
Selective activation of ras oncogenes in follicular and undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas.
Mutations in the ras oncogene are frequent in malignant pancreatic disease (10, 25,26) and variable in cholangiocarcinoma (3, 27-29).
Identification of ras oncogene mutations in the stool of patients with curable colorectal tumors.
Arglabin inhibits the enzyme Farnesyl Transferase (FTase), an enzyme critical to the function of the Ras oncogene.
In addition, Genentech has a broad and intensive effort in preclinical cancer research, including: anti-VEGF, which may inhibit blood vessel growth in tumors; the Ras oncogene, which may have the potential to stop uncontrolled cell division in certain cancers, such as pancreatic cancer; and thrombopoietin (TPO), which may be useful in treating the platelet destruction caused by irradiation and chemotherapy.