rapture

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rapture

A state of great joy, delight, or ecstasy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Raptures Boro hit the woodwork four times in the first half but it was Wolves who re-established their advantage immediately after the interval courtesy of the superb Bjorn Sigurdarson.
Summary: Canada based Indian comedian Sugar Sammy left audiences laughing for quite some time after his show in an evening filled with harmless sarcasm and raptures of laughter throughout.
But it was Cabrera who put his Raptures to best use last weekend on a punishing Oakmont course rated as the toughest US Open track ever.
Isadora Duncan rode the wave of revolt against Puritanism; she rode it, and with her fame and Dionysian raptures, drove it on.
Sullivan's is no casual study: eight years of research went into this narrative, which provides a running history of over 100 years of raptures, holy apparitions and experiences.
The ballet featured three pas de deux separated by allegro ensembles and culminated with all six dancers caught in a series of poses, like brief raptures, before they eased into the final, harmonious grouping.
Donald McKayle's Mysteries and Raptures, a premiere, was thwarted by limiting music.
Mysteries and Raptures, McKayle's contemporary treatment of an ancient Hindu theme, was too slow and static to serve as a curtain-raiser for Flindt's ninety-minute theater piece.
If Rashid helps us to contextualize violence and fear in the present day, being evoked in Nameera's shots of slaughtering chicken, then there is sufficient room for rapture.
American Evangelical radio pastor Harold Camping had predicted the Rapture - the time when God's chosen people ascend to heaven and the rest of us burn in hell.
The word "rapture" crops up in poems and reviews of poetry more and more often, and recently, it seems, the sense of the word has changed to connote something separate from its original meaning: to be carried away, if not transformed, is the goal of speakers in work by several contemporary poets: for some of these, rapture signifies an escape from the ordinary and implies an ecstacy derived from a turning from this world; for others it suggests a kind of Dickinsonian marvellousness within the ordinary.