rapid eye movements


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

rap·id eye move·ments (REM),

symmetric quick scanning movements of the eyes occurring many times during sleep in clusters for 5-60 minutes; associated with dreaming.

rap·id eye move·ments

(REM) (rap'id ī mūv'mĕnts)
Symmetric quick scanning movements of the eyes occurring many times during sleep in clusters for 5-60 minutes; associated with dreaming.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) Analyses of rapid eye movements in normal subjects].
Human cerebral potentials associated with REM sleep rapid eye movements: links to PGO waves and waking potentials.
Neuronal activity in the caudolateral peribrachial pons: Relationship to PGO waves and rapid eye movements. J Neurophysiol 1994; 71:95-109.
The noradrenergic (NA-ergic) rapid eye movement (REM)-OFF neurons in locus coeruleus (LC) and cholinergic REM-ON neurons in laterodorsal/pedunculopontine tegmentum show a reciprocal firing pattern.
As with most of the great discoveries in experimental science, the discovery of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was more an act of serendipity than a concerted effort to look for something as complex and astonishing as REM sleep.
The golden age of rapid eye movement sleep discoveries: 1965-1966.
Poewe, "Disturbance of rapid eye movement sleep in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2," Movement Disorders, vol.
Mahowald, "Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: a treatable parasomnia affecting older adults," JAMA, vol.
Matsuura, "Do patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder have a disease-specific personality?," Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, vol.
Hogl et al., "Risk factors for neurodegeneration in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: a multicenter study," Annals of Neurology, vol.
Mahowald, "Delayed emergence of a parkinsonian disorder in 38% of 29 older men initially diagnosed with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder," Neurology, vol.
Tolosa, "Idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder: diagnosis, management, and the need for neuroprotective interventions," The Lancet Neurology, vol.

Full browser ?