range of motion


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range

 [rānj]
1. the difference between the upper and lower limits of a variable or of a series of values.
2. an interval in which values sampled from a population, or the values in the population itself, are known to lie.
range of accommodation the total amount of accommodative power of the eye; the difference in refractive power of the eye when adjusted for near and for far vision. The amplitude diminishes as age increases because elasticity of the lens is decreased.
range of audibility the range between the extreme frequencies of sound waves beyond which the human ear perceives no sound: lower limit, 16 to 20 cycles per second; upper limit, 18,000 to 20,000 cycles per second.
range of motion the range, measured in degrees of a circle, through which a joint can be extended and flexed; see also range of motion exercises.

range of motion (ROM)

Etymology: OFr, ranger + L, motio
the extent of movement of a joint, measured in degrees of a circle. See also active range of motion, passive range of motion.

range of motion

Physical exam The range through which a joint can be moved, usually its range of flexion and extension, as determined by the type of joint, its articular surfaces, and that allowed by regional muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints and physiologic control of movement across the joint

range of mo·tion

(ROM) (rānj mō'shŭn)
1. The measured beginning and terminal angles, as well as the total degrees of motion, traversed by a joint moved by active muscle contraction or by passive movement.
2. Joint movement (active, passive, or a combination of both) carried out to assess, preserve, or increase the arc of joint motion.

Range of motion (ROM)

The range of motion of a joint from full extension to full flexion (bending) measured in degrees like a circle.

range of motion

natural amount of movement within a joint

range of mo·tion

(ROM) (rānj mō'shŭn)
The measured beginning and terminal angles and total degrees of motion, traversed by a joint moved by active muscle contraction or by passive movement.

range

1. the difference between the upper and lower limits of a variable or of a series of values.
2. extensive grazing land which provides seasonal feed supply of pasture comprising grasses and clovers and other legumes supplemented by forbs and browse.
3. a husbandry system where animals are permitted to roam free, within reasonable limits, i.e. they are not confined in corrals, lots, yards, houses, barns, byres and the like. Called also free range.
4. animals maintained as in 3 above, e.g. range cattle. Called also range-reared.

annual range
rangeland on which the principal forage plants are self-perpetuating annual herbaceous species.
arid range
lack of sufficient moisture severely limits growth and production of vegetation. Generally considered that this will occur with less than 10 inches (25 cm) of rain in a temperate climate.
range of audibility
the range between the extreme frequencies of sound waves beyond which the ear of each species perceives no sound.
range cubes
large pellets of compacted feed, between a pellet and a log, approximately 1 inch cubed, used to feed animals at pasture. Can be fed on the ground with very little loss.
free range
see (3) (above).
range goldenrod
solidagomollis.
range of motion
the range, measured in degrees of a circle, through which a joint can be extended and flexed. See also range of motion exercises (below).
range of motion exercises
exercises calculated to extend the range of extension and flexion of an impaired joint.
range paralysis
range-reared
see range (3 above).
range stiffness
a disease of lambs. See bluetongue.

Patient discussion about range of motion

Q. How do I gain range of motion after shoulder surgery I'm 31 years old and had a shoulder replacment last year. I still don't know why my joint gave out and 4 Orthopedic Surgeons couldn't tell me either. I have limited Range of Motion and the Dr. seems to think that because of my "age" I was less likley to get full range back. I refuse to believe that, does anyone have any suggestions on how to gain ROM back?

A. i guess you go to physiotherapy no?
that is their job. to give you range of motion after injuries, surgeries ect. they'll give you exercises specially for your condition. when i had an accident i broke my leg hip and i needed 2 months of physiotherapy that helped very much.

More discussions about range of motion
References in periodicals archive ?
Execution: Using an alternative object such as a cone, weighted ball, rod or innertube, the athlete assumes a power position and begins the delivery with emphasis on moving through a complete range of motion into a high angle of release, which ends with the athlete releasing the object into the sector.
It is a useable range of motion in which the muscles are capable of moving the limb through the range of motion developed for your running stride.
The criterion test involved range of motion measures obtained with a Dualer IQ digital dual inclinometer (JTECH Medical, Salt Lake City, UT, USA), with primary and secondary sensors.
Glenohumeral joint: internal and external rotation range of motion in javelin throwers.
Shoulder flexion range of motion was significantly greater after exercises performed at the intensity of 80% of 1RM versus the intensity of 60% of 1 RM (P<0.
Function was measured as power grip strength, pinch grip strength, key grip strength, and supination strength as well as wrist flexion/extension and forearm supination/pronation range of motion.
Once range of motion is restored, the surgeon's approval is needed to begin training with equipment.
Most effective is to stretch and strengthen the joint-support structures simultaneously through the same range of motion.
The natural history of glenohumeral osteoarthritis is gradual loss of range of motion and increasing pain, but a patient can do things to slow the process and delay or avoid shoulder replacement surgery.
Flexibility refers to the range of motion of a joint or a series of joints that are influenced by muscles, ligaments, tendons, and bony structures.
Swimming or water aerobics decreases arthritis pain, increases range of motion, and improves cardiovascular fitness.