randomization

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randomization

 [ran″dom-ĭ-za´shun]
random assignment.
The use of randomization in the design of a clinical trial. From Gordis, 1996.

ran·dom·i·za·tion

(ran'dom-ĭ-zā'shun),
Random allocation, the process of selecting entities, for example, treatment regimens, using a formal system whereby each entity has a known, generally an equal chance of being selected. This may be accomplished by means of a table of random numbers, toss of a coin, or some other system in which selection or nonselection is determined by chance alone.

randomization

Random assignment, random allocation, randomized allocation Statistics The selection of subjects or samples for each 'arm' of a study or experiment based on chance alone–ie, a theoretical coin toss, which is intended to minimize the influence of irrelevant details and selection bias, and produce statistically valid data. Cf Convenience sample.

ran·dom·i·za·tion

(ran'dŏm-ī-zā'shŭn)
Assignment of the subjects of experimental research to groups by chance.
Synonym(s): randomisation.
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Effects of vitamin D and calcium supplementation on pancreatic b cell function, insulin sensitivt'ty, and gfycemia in adults at high risk of diabetes: the Calcium and Vitamin D for Diabetes Mellitus(CaDDM) randomized controlled trial.
All trials involved an open-label phase after the randomized treatment period ended.
"For the group randomized to immediate suppressive therapy, 60% of them had normal development at 12 months of age.
ASSERT randomized 385 adults who received treatment during the trial.
For patients randomized to receive rintatolimod, the length of the one-sided 95% limit is approximately 10 milliseconds, equal to the pre-specified threshold stated in Section 2.2.4 of Guidance Document E14.
Quality of reporting in randomized trials published in high-quality surgical journals.
There are many problems that are able to erode the credibility and relevance of randomized trials, but few efforts have been made to collect all the empirical evidence about these problems and see the total magnitude of the challenges at hand.
Critical care professionals must begin to see the possibilities of another world in which healing practices consist of more than bad food (or no food at all), noisy monitors, and drugs derived from randomized controlled trials.
Not surprisingly, the new study's name has an acronym: Acronym-named Randomized Trials (ART) in Medicine.
Randomized field trials are not the best or only way to address k all important research questions, but they are often described as the "gold standard." This month's column explores why researchers and NCLB express enthusiasm for experimental research designs, why schools may hesitate to participate, and possible win-win solutions.
(1) In a randomized controlled trial conducted in Philadelphia, participants in a skills-based STD prevention intervention reported less unprotected sex one year later than did a control group, who received a general health promotion intervention.
A multicenter, randomized study comparing the efficacy and safety of intravenous and/or oral levofloxacin versus ceftriaxone and/or cefuroxime axetil in treatment of adults with community-acquired pneumonia.

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