randomization


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randomization

 [ran″dom-ĭ-za´shun]
random assignment.
The use of randomization in the design of a clinical trial. From Gordis, 1996.

ran·dom·i·za·tion

(ran'dom-ĭ-zā'shun),
Random allocation, the process of selecting entities, for example, treatment regimens, using a formal system whereby each entity has a known, generally an equal chance of being selected. This may be accomplished by means of a table of random numbers, toss of a coin, or some other system in which selection or nonselection is determined by chance alone.

randomization

Random assignment, random allocation, randomized allocation Statistics The selection of subjects or samples for each 'arm' of a study or experiment based on chance alone–ie, a theoretical coin toss, which is intended to minimize the influence of irrelevant details and selection bias, and produce statistically valid data. Cf Convenience sample.

ran·dom·i·za·tion

(ran'dŏm-ī-zā'shŭn)
Assignment of the subjects of experimental research to groups by chance.
Synonym(s): randomisation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first step is to remember that adjudicators cannot rationally adhere to a flat rule in favor of deliberate randomization on all issues.
Indeed, previous studies have observed improvements in jumping performance after interventions applied with (Ramirez-Campillo et al., 2016b; Rosas et al., 2016) or without (Kobal et al., 2017) PJT drill randomization between training sessions, although none of the aforementioned studies compared the effects of PJT with versus without drill randomization between sessions.
Despite its strengths, the Mendelian Randomization of Dairy Consumption Working Group's study may be misleading in using the LP variant as an IV of dairy intake in general, rather than milk specifically.
We had forgotten that the initial randomization would, by definition, surely give two similar groups of patients.
Among patients in the usual care group, 20.7 percent (95 percent CI: 19.7, 21.8) had an office visit within 3 months of randomization compared with 21.0 percent (95 percent CI: 20.2, 21.7) in the intervention group [p = .72, Table 3).
Our approach is to revisit the granularity at which randomization is completed.
In our example, the trial can be written as: "This is a single center, parallel-group, controlled, participant-physician blinded study, with balanced randomization, conducted in Karachi, Pakistan." "Parallel group" means that there are two intervention arms i.e., patients are either allocated to drug "B" or drug "A".
Randomization, which means that participants are randomly assigned to a treatment group, helps prevent bias on the part of researchers.
Half of patients randomized to the 4-week regime were retained, abstinent, and receiving naltrexone at the end of the study (6-12 weeks after randomization), compared with 17% of patients on the 2-week regime and 21% of patients on the 1-week regime (P = 0.03).
The trials showed that randomization to either drug, in addition to a calorie-restricted diet and increased exercise, was associated with more weight loss than patients' randomization to placebos (3 percent more weight loss with lorcaserin; 7 percent more with phentermine/topiramate).
Simulations are carried out to investigate network fundamental diagram and the effect of the randomization probability and the maximum vehicle speed on network traffic mobility.