random allocation


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random allocation

In a clinical trial, the assignment of subjects or patients to treatment (or control) groups in an unpredictable fashion.
In a blinded study, assignment sequences are concealed, but can be disclosed in the event of adverse events.
References in periodicals archive ?
The analysis of 82 recorded informed consent discussions between doctors and patients found random allocation was mentioned less than two-thirds of the time and only 17% of the doctors checked their patient's comprehension (Jenkins, Fallowfield, Souhami, & Sawtell, 1999).
The consolidated identifier usually implies a higher predicted Indigenous population within the ROD than would be predicted using the percentage of ATSI estimated after the random allocation of unknowns.
The paper reports use of a random allocation procedure, ie, coin-tossing (Design, p.
Items ranged from approximately -3 logits for the most adhered to item random allocation, to the least adhered to item at approximately +3 logits therapist blinding.
Mr Balls said random allocation was the fairest way of resolving decisions in some areas but should only be "absolutely the last resort".
The public survey suggests that when explained clearly and put into context, a high proportion of the UK public think that using random allocation is the fairer 'tiebreaker' when deciding school places.
In the old days this would have been a purely random allocation based on serial numbers.
The eighth item is about reporting the method used to generate the random allocation sequence including details of any restriction (e.
The random allocation ensures that the two groups being compared are not different in ways that would influence their response to a particular treatment, For instance, suppose you wanted to test the quality of a new reading curriculum.
This Phase IV, random allocation, single-blind study will compare the safety and effectiveness of two treatments to prevent relapses in seriously ill patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who have responded to electro-convulsive therapy (ECT).

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