random allocation


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random allocation

In a clinical trial, the assignment of subjects or patients to treatment (or control) groups in an unpredictable fashion.
In a blinded study, assignment sequences are concealed, but can be disclosed in the event of adverse events.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yan, "A generic minimization random allocation and blinding system on web," Journal of Biomedical Informatics, vol.
Notwithstanding this, as indicated above, the estimates based on the random allocation of unknowns for the consolidated Indigenous identifier are likely to provide a close approximation of our best guess for the true Indigenous population within NSW courts.
Characteristic Sample 1 Sample 2 (n = 100) (n = 100) Year of publication, n = % 1960s 1 0 1970s 6 3 1980s 17 12 1990s 36 33 2000s 40 52 Area of physiotherapy intervention, n = % Musculoskeletal 46 48 Cardiothoracics 11 13 Neurology 12 9 Paediatrics 2 7 Medical 15 11 Other 14 12 PEDro score, mean (SD) 4.8 (1.6) 5.2 (1.5) Item adherence, n = % Eligibility 74 76 Random allocation 93 96 Concealed allocation 22 29 Similarity at baseline 64 76 Subject blinding 13 5 Therapist blinding 2 3 Assessor blinding 40 34 > 85% follow-up 54 67 Intention-to-treat analysis 19 25 Between-group statistical 88 93 comparison Point and variability 80 92 measures
Second, random allocation generates far more unevenness among small plants than among large plants.
Patients were allocated group A or B using random allocation based on computer generated table of random numbers with 138 subjects in each group.
As shown in Figure 2(a), when the communication range is set to 5 meters, eCOTS and random allocation do not have much difference.
Lara and colleagues would add patient and physician lack of equipoise to the above list.[sup.3] Given our climate of health care consumerism, the lack of equipoise is a particular challenge when evaluating interventions that are available off study - why, as a patient, would you subject yourself to a random allocation of treatment A versus B when you can choose?
In the recently completed Justification for Use of Statins in Prevention: An Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) [2] trial, which was conducted with 17 802 primary-prevention patients with LDL cholesterol concentrations <3.37 mmol/L (<130 mg/ dL) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentrations [greater than or equal to]2 mg/L, random allocation to treatment with 20 mg rosuvastatin was associated with a 54% reduction in the incidence of myocardial infarction, a 48% reduction in stroke, a 47% reduction in the need for angioplasty or bypass surgery, a 43% reduction in venous thrombosis, and a 20% reduction in all-cause mortality (1).
The operators selected the tooth on which to carry out treatment before being given the computerised random allocation of the injection method but the actual treatment performed, e.g.
However, nature's random allocation of ability has made another sibling, Barnfield Haveit, a short four-bend type.
Methodological limitations of these studies were noted in the review, specific concerns being a lack of random allocation, a lack of blinded assessors, and a lack of similarity of the patient groups at baseline.
It means children with special needs will be given priority, but after that there would be random allocation.

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