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standard

 [stan´dard]
something established as a measure or model to which other similar things should conform. There are three types of standards in health care: structure, process, and outcome standards. Structure refers to evaluation of the setting in which care is rendered and the resources that are available. Process refers to evaluation of the actual activities carried out by the care giver. Outcome refers to evaluation of the results of activities in which the nurse has been involved (what the result is for the patient).
s's of practice a set of guidelines that identifies the content of practice and serves as a model to guide care towards excellence.

stan·dard

(stan'dărd),
1. Something that serves as a basis for comparison; a technical specification or written report by experts.
2.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr. estandard, rallying place, fr. Frankish standan, to stand, + hard, hard, fast]

standard

/stan·dard/ (stan´dard) something established as a measure or model to which other similar things should conform.

standard

Etymology: OFr, estandart
1 n, an evaluation that serves as a basis for comparison for evaluating similar phenomena or substances, such as a standard for the preparation of a pharmaceutic substance or a standard for the practice of a profession.
2 n, a pharmaceutic preparation or a chemical substance of known quantity, ingredients, and strength that is used to determine the constituents or the strength of another preparation.
3 adj, of known value, strength, quality, or ingredients.
4 n, predetermined criteria used to provide guidance in the operation of a health care facility to ensure high-quality performance by the personnel. standardization, n., standardize, v.

standard

EBM
In a clinical trial, a criterion or specification established by authority or consensus for:
(1) Measuring performance or quality; and
(2) Specifying conventions that support interchange of common materials and information.

CDISC standards support the exchange of clinical data at syntactic and semantic levels.

standard

Medtalk A benchmark for measuring and comparing similar or analogous activities or persons. See Air Quality standard, Community standard, Capacity standard, Double standard, Engineering standard, Ergonomic standard, Food standard, Gold standard, Internal standard, Medicare volume performance standard, Ordinary negligence standard, Patient viewpoint standard, Performance standard, Practice standard standard, Prudent layperson standard, Reasonable person standard, Reasonable physician standard, Small parts standard, Zero error standard.

stan·dard

(stan'dărd)
Something that serves as a basis for comparison; a technical specification or written report by experts.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr. estandard, rallying place, fr. Frankish standan, to stand, + hard, hard, fast]

stan·dard

(stan'dărd)
Something that serves as a basis for comparison; a technical specification or written report by experts.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr. estandard, rallying place, fr. Frankish standan, to stand, + hard, hard, fast]

standard

something established as a measure or model to which other similar things should conform.

bacteriological standard of meat
the standard bacterial count of meat beyond which local legislation forbids the sale or use of meat. The international standard is for <107/g of meat and that Salmonella spp. should not be present in more than one of five 25 g samples, all held at 95°F (35°C) or 68°F (20°C) for chilled meat.
standard bicarbonate
in blood gas analysis this is the plasma level of bicarbonate, under specified conditions, which eliminates the influence of respiration on the values obtained.
standard deviation
a measure of the dispersal of a random variable; the square root of the average squared deviation from the mean. For data that have a normal distribution about 68% of the data points fall within one standard deviation from the mean and 95% fall within two standard deviations. Symbol is σ.
standard error
the standard deviation of an estimate.
standard error of mean
the sampling variability of the mean.
standard international (SI) units
see Table 3.
standard population
a population not yet divided into classes; the population against which each of its constituent classes can be compared.
standard Salmonella pullorum strains
strains that contain only small amounts of 122 antigen.
References in periodicals archive ?
That is why we will support teachers with continuous learning and development, better support and identify our leaders, and reduce class sizes so that we can raise standards for all.
Former CBI Director-General Richard Lambert who has been appointed by Britain's biggest banks to set up and >lead a new independent body to raise standards in the banking industry
When asked if "the RDR proposes realistic proposals to raise standards of professionalism", 88 per cent said yes, with most respondents clearly expressing a wish to raise standards through CPD, ethics and higher level examinations.
The school has been working to raise standards in writing and there are signs of improvement.
A council spokeswoman said: "We are committed to helping our children and young people to fulfil their potential, and are working hard to raise standards across the board.
George Garlick, Stockton Council's chief executive, said: "The agreement is part of our continuing drive to raise standards for people in the borough.
A THIRD of all primary school English and maths lessons are ``no better than satisfactory'' despite a major government drive to raise standards, Ofsted said yesterday.
SCOTTISH Secretary Donald Dewar yesterday unveiled a brave new vision to raise standards in education.
We believe as others do that this consolidation will serve to raise standards and provide for broader and more sophisticated services, whether on the brokerage or property management side.
EDUCATION Minister Huw Lewis has given schools, colleges and local authorities new powers to "facilitate innovation" in a bid to raise standards.