radon


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radon

 [ra´don]
a chemical element, atomic number 86, atomic weight 222, symbol Rn. (See Appendix 6.) Radon is a colorless, gaseous, radioactive element produced by the disintegration of radium.

ra·don (Rn),

(rā'don),
A gaseous radioactive element, atomic no. 86, resulting from the breakdown of radium; of the isotopes with mass numbers between 198 and 228, only 222Rn is medically significant as an α-emitter, with a half-life of 3.8235 days; it is used in the treatment of certain malignancies. Poorly ventilated homes in some parts of the country have accumulated a dangerous amount of naturally occurring radon gas.
[from radium]

radon

(rā′dŏn)
n. Symbol Rn
A colorless, radioactive, inert gaseous element that is formed by the radioactive decay of radium and is used to produce neutrons for research. Its most stable isotope is Rn-222 with a half-life of 3.82 days. A natural source of radiation found in most soils and groundwater, radon poses a serious health threat if inhaled. Atomic number 86; melting point -71°C; boiling point -61.7°C; density of gas 9.73 grams per liter; specific gravity (solid) 4. See Periodic Table.

radon

A naturally occurring radioactive gas in the decay chain of uranium-238 to lead-206, which has a half-life of 3.8 days; it decays into two solid, alpha-particle-emitting daughters. Radon exposure is associated with 13-fold increased risk of lung cancer in non-smoking uranium miners; it also increases the risk of childhood cancer, myeloid leukaemia, renal cell carcinoma, melanoma and prostate cancer.

13,000 annual excess cases of lung cancer in the US are attributed to radon gas. Long-term exposure to 150 Bq/m3 is equivalent to smoking half a pack of cigarettes a day; at ≥ 10.8 pCi/L (400 Bq/m3), the relative risk is 1.8; combined radon exposure and smoking exceed an additive and approach a multiplicative effect.

radon

222Ra Public health A natural radioactive gaseous element, atomic number 86; atomic weight, 211.4 in the 238U → 206Pb decay chain; radon has a T1⁄2 of 3.8 days, decays into 2 solid α particle-emitting daughters; radon exposure carries a relative risk of 12.7 for lung CA in non-smoking uranium miners and an ↑ risk of childhood CA, myelogenous leukemia, renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, prostate CA. See Radionics, Radium Dial Company.

ra·don

(rā'don)
A gaseous radioactive element, atomic no. 86, resulting from the breakdown of radium; 222Rn is medically significant as an alpha-emitter with a half-life of 3.8235 days; it is used in the treatment of some malignancies. Poorly ventilated homes in some parts of the United States accumulate a dangerous amount of naturally occurring radon gas.

ra·don

(rā'don)
A gaseous radioactive element, resulting from breakdown of radium; some isotopes used to treat malignancies. Poorly ventilated homes in some parts of the U.S. have accumulated a dangerous amount of naturally occurring radon gas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Any householder who is concerned and wants to check radon levels in their home can order a radon risk reportfrom the UKRadon websitefor [pounds sterling]3.90.
Residents can order detectors to measure the radiation in their own homes to determine the health risk (stock photo for illustrative purposes and not necessarily representative of the equipment used for radon detection)
"The story is that if you look around the world, there is a substantial burden of lung cancer from radon," Samet says.
Global estimate of lung cancer mortality attributable to residential radon. Environ Health Perspect 126(5):057009, PMID: 29856911, https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP2503.
The evaluation of clinical signs, and measurement of urine specific gravity and body weight in each mouse was conducted before radon inhalation, at the time of CDDP administration, and at 72 h after CDDP administration.
Testing a home's radon levels during the coldest months of winter gives homeowners and radon remediation contractors the clearest picture of a property's radon risk.
To our knowledge, this study is the first to assess SCT-based characteristics associated with radon testing.
Dr Mark Foley of NUI Galway says modern houses "act like a hoover and sucks the radon up from the ground".
The data is broken down into high, medium and low risk categories, The South-East and West of Ireland are classed as large high risk areas, but the map shows homes with high radon levels could be found in any county.
The active measurements were done using the state-of-the-art equipment, the Portable Radon Monitor (SMART RnDuo), developed by BARC (Bhaba Atomic Research Center, Mumbai).
In spite of significant advancements, radon measurement techniques have not been widely applied in areas other than pollution controls, healthcare, geological engineering, and mining safety.