radionuclide


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radionuclide

 [ra″de-o-noo´klīd]
a radioactive nuclide; one that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd),
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity.

radionuclide

/ra·dio·nu·clide/ (-noo´klīd) a nuclide that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

radionuclide

[-no̅o̅′klīd]
Etymology: L, radiare + nucleus, nut kernel
an isotope that undergoes radioactive decay. Any element with an excess of either neutrons or protons in the nucleus is unstable and tends toward radioactive decay, with the emission of energy that may be measurable with a detector. The processes of radioactive decay include beta particle emission, electron capture, isomeric transition, and positron emission. Positron-emitting radionuclides are important in positron emission tomography and in medical research. Radionuclides used in scintigraphy include 123I, 131I, 111In, 75Se, 99mTc, and 201Tl. Radionuclides of cobalt, iodine, phosphorus, strontium, and other elements are used for treatment of tumors and cancers and for nuclear imaging of internal parts of the body. See also nuclear scanning.

radionuclide

Radioactive isotope, radioisotope Radiation physics A nuclide with an unstable neutron to proton ratio, which undergoes radioactive decay; an artificial or natural nuclide with an unstable nucleus, that decays spontaneously, emitting electrons–β-particles or protons–α-particles and γ-radiation, ultimately achieving nuclear stability; RNs are used as in vivo or in vitro labels, for RT, or as sources of energy

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd)
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity. Radionuclides are used in diagnostic imaging and cancer therapy.

Radionuclide

A chemical substance, called an isotope, that exhibits radioactivity. A gamma camera, used in nuclear medicine procedures, will pick up the radioactive signals as the substance gathers in an organ or tissue. They are sometimes referred to as tracers.

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd)
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity. Radionuclides are used in diagnostic imaging and cancer therapy.

radionuclide (rā´dēōnoo´klīd),

n an unstable or radioactive type of atom characterized by the constitution of its nucleus and capable of existing for a measurable time. The nuclear constitution is specified by the number of protons
(A), number of neutrons
(N), and energy content, or alternatively by the atomic number
(Z), mass number
(A − N + Z), and atomic mass.

radionuclide

a radioactive nuclide; one that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations. Used in diagnosis for whole body or individual organ scanning. See also radioactive isotope, nuclide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Radionuclide scanning is used to image the structure of many internal organs and provide a measure of their function.
Subpart H is therefore intended to limit radionuclide emissions (except radon) from the stacks and vents at DOE facilities to ensure no member of the public receives an effective dose equivalent to more than 10 millirems per year (mrem/yr) or in SI units 0.
Therefore information about radiation levels and radionuclide distribution in the environment is consider important for assessing the effects of radiation exposure due to both terrestrial and cosmogenic sources [1].
For his part, KISR Director Al-Mutairi revealed that Kuwait had hosted a radionuclides station from 1994 to 2000 to provide information to the International Data Center (IDC) which collects, processes and analyses monitoring data.
The determination as well as removal of natural radionuclides from drinking water has become increasingly important during the past few years.
Examples of human activities that may lead to radionuclide exposure include mining, milling, and processing of radio-active substances; wastewater releases from the hydraulic fracturing of oil and natural gas wells; and the manufacture, use, disposal, and/or accidental release of products such as nuclear fuel, nuclear weapons, military armor, phosphate fertilizer, and certain medical devices, smoke detectors, and plastics.
While all food contains radionuclides, whether from natural sources, nuclear testing or otherwise, the increased levels found in Japanese spinach and milk pose health risks to the population.
18]F nuclide is more preferred radionuclide due to the lowest energy.
PPE can, however, protect the responder from internal or external radionuclide contamination.
A smart processor examines each photon as it arrives and decides whether a detected radionuclide is accepted or not based on selected parameters.