radioisotope

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radioisotope

 [ra″de-o-i´so-tōp]
a radioactive form of an element, consisting of atoms with unstable nuclei, which undergo radioactive decay to stable forms, emitting characteristic alpha, beta, or gamma radiation. These may occur naturally, as in the cases of radium and uranium, or may be created artificially. Scientists create artificial radioisotopes by bombarding stable atoms of an element with subatomic particles in a nuclear reactor or in an atom smasher, or cyclotron. When the nucleus of a stable atom is charged by bombarding particles, the atom usually becomes unstable, or radioactive, and is said to be “labeled” or “tagged.” See also radiation therapy.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sō-tōp),
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope

/ra·dio·iso·tope/ (-i´so-tōp) a radioactive isotope; one having an unstable nucleus and emitting characteristic radiation during its decay to a stable form.

radioisotope

[rā′dē·ō·ī′sətōp]
Etymology: L, radius + Gk, isos, equal, topos, place
a radioactive form of an element, which may be used for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sŏ-tōp)
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope

see ISOTOPE.

Radioisotope

A chemical tagged with radioactive compounds that is injected during a nuclear medicine procedure to highlight organ or tissue.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sŏ-tōp)
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope (rā´dēōī´sōtōp),

n a chemical element that has been made radioactive through bombardment of neutrons in a cyclotron or atomic pile or found in a natural state.

radioisotope

a radioactive form of an element. A radioisotope consists of unstable atoms that undergo radioactive decay emitting alpha, beta or gamma radiation. Radioisotopes occur naturally, as in the cases of radium and uranium, or may be created artificially. See also radionuclide.
Artificial radioisotopes are created by bombarding stable atoms of an element with subatomic particles in a nuclear reactor or in an atom smasher, or cyclotron. When the nucleus of a stable atom is charged by bombarding particles, the atom usually becomes unstable, or radioactive, and is said to be 'labeled' or 'tagged'.

radioisotope organ scanning
injection of an isotope and scanning of organs in which the isotope is planned to locate, e.g. radioactive iodine in the thyroid gland.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet they fail to explain why there are so many cases where there is good concordance of isochrons, something which would never happen if radioisotopic dating were not valid.
The astronomers expect to improve the accuracy of radioisotopic dating for this and other stars in the future.
Labeled-antibody techniques fluorescent, radioisotopic, immunochemical.
For example, in the scallop Argopecten irradians and the marine clam Mercenaria mercenaria, shell enlargement was measured by radioisotopic approaches to range from about 0.
Richardson also announced that a DOE Space Power System program, which produces radioisotopic generators and heat sources for National Aeronautics and Space Administration deep space missions, would remain at Mound as the department plans to otherwise leave the site by 2004.
Radioisotopic or chemiluminescent methods are used to label probes.
3) Tiffet O et al; "Combining radioisotopic and blue-dye technique does not improve the false-negative rate in sentinel lymph node mapping for colorectal cancer.
The 1981-1982 edition of the Green Book included the additional subspecialties of dermatopathology, blood bank, and radioisotopic pathology as approved categories of pathology training (Table 3).
Radioisotopic thermal generators (RTGs) in Russia are of special concern.
It was further evaluated by sulfur colloid radioisotopic imaging which confirmed the diagnosis of adenoma.
This luminescence assay is the alternative to colorimetric, fluorometric and radioisotopic assays for the quantitative evaluation of proliferation and cytotoxicity of cultured mammalian cells (Crouch et al.
Radioisotopic procedures have proved invaluable in this area of research, and the technique of isotope dilution (L value, described below) is the reference standard against which chemical extraction procedures should be compared.