radioisotope


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radioisotope

 [ra″de-o-i´so-tōp]
a radioactive form of an element, consisting of atoms with unstable nuclei, which undergo radioactive decay to stable forms, emitting characteristic alpha, beta, or gamma radiation. These may occur naturally, as in the cases of radium and uranium, or may be created artificially. Scientists create artificial radioisotopes by bombarding stable atoms of an element with subatomic particles in a nuclear reactor or in an atom smasher, or cyclotron. When the nucleus of a stable atom is charged by bombarding particles, the atom usually becomes unstable, or radioactive, and is said to be “labeled” or “tagged.” See also radiation therapy.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sō-tōp),
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope

/ra·dio·iso·tope/ (-i´so-tōp) a radioactive isotope; one having an unstable nucleus and emitting characteristic radiation during its decay to a stable form.

radioisotope

[rā′dē·ō·ī′sətōp]
Etymology: L, radius + Gk, isos, equal, topos, place
a radioactive form of an element, which may be used for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sŏ-tōp)
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope

see ISOTOPE.

Radioisotope

A chemical tagged with radioactive compounds that is injected during a nuclear medicine procedure to highlight organ or tissue.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sŏ-tōp)
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope (rā´dēōī´sōtōp),

n a chemical element that has been made radioactive through bombardment of neutrons in a cyclotron or atomic pile or found in a natural state.

radioisotope

a radioactive form of an element. A radioisotope consists of unstable atoms that undergo radioactive decay emitting alpha, beta or gamma radiation. Radioisotopes occur naturally, as in the cases of radium and uranium, or may be created artificially. See also radionuclide.
Artificial radioisotopes are created by bombarding stable atoms of an element with subatomic particles in a nuclear reactor or in an atom smasher, or cyclotron. When the nucleus of a stable atom is charged by bombarding particles, the atom usually becomes unstable, or radioactive, and is said to be 'labeled' or 'tagged'.

radioisotope organ scanning
injection of an isotope and scanning of organs in which the isotope is planned to locate, e.g. radioactive iodine in the thyroid gland.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, the Mo-99 produced by NorthStar's RadioGenix System, a proprietary one-of-a-kind automated radioisotope separation system that utilizes a worldwide patented on-board, on-demand, point-of-use sterilization system to produce USP compliant Sodium Pertechnetate Tc 99m Injection in the same form that is offered today by all other suppliers and which is expected by today's nuclear pharmacist.
The currently available radioisotope power system, also supplied to NASA by the DOE, is called the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG).
Also it is possible to detect increased uptake of radioisotope in the elbow join area according to abnormalities.
If the Titan IV or Centaur, or both, explode over Africa and the radioisotope thermoelectric generators "impact rock surfaces," as NASA euphemistically puts it, the probe would probably release plutonium on the continent.
The use of radioisotope techniques for problem-solving is increasing steadily as more and more potential applications are identified.
Carbon-11 targets are designed to eliminate any source of naturally occurring carbon that would degrade the diagnostic capability of the radioisotope.
Mo-99 is the parent isotope of technetium-99m (Tc-99m), the most widely used radioisotope in medical diagnostic imaging.
ClickPress, Mon May 13 2013] Nuclear Medicine/Radiopharmaceuticals [SPECT/PET Radioisotopes (Technetium, F-18)], [Beta/Alpha radiation therapy (I131, Y-90)], [Applications (Cancer/Oncology, Cardiac)] & Stable Isotopes (Deuterium, C-13) Market - Global Trends & Forecast to 2017
Because that half-life differs from one radioisotope to the next, we can use it as a simple clock to study a host of ocean processes that take place across different timescales, from days to years to millennia," Benitez-Nelson said.
In addition to the Tehran research reactor which has long been used by radioisotope production, Iran plans to build four other research reactors in the other parts of the country, he added.
This study demonstrates the advantages of pretargeting-an alternative strategy that uses a 'two-step' approach to the delivery of radioisotopes-when applied to the imaging of tumors using a combination of radioisotope and antibody or RAII," said Otto Boerman, lead researcher of the study.
Tokyo, Japan, July 10, 2006 - (JCN) - Nihon Schering announced on June 4 that it signed a joint business contract with Daiichi Radioisotope Laboratories (DRL) regarding Zevalin, a radioimmunotherapy agent used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.