radiograph

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radiograph

 [ra´de-o-graf″]
an image or record produced on exposed or processed film by radiography.
Relative positions of x-ray tube, patient, and film necessary to make the radiograph shown. Bones tend to stop diagnostic x-rays, but soft tissue does not. This results in the light and dark regions that form the image. From Thompson et al., 1994.
bite-wing radiograph a type of dental radiograph that reveals the crowns, necks, and coronal thirds of the roots of both the upper and lower posterior teeth, as well as the dental arches, produced using bite-wing film.
cephalometric radiograph a radiograph of the head, including the mandible, in full lateral view; used to make measurements; called also cephalogram.
flat plate radiograph a radiograph that visualizes abdominal organs and some abnormalities. It is usually one of the first diagnostic studies performed in assessing a patient for gastrointestinal disorders; no special physical preparation of the patient is necessary.
panoramic radiograph a type of extraoral body-section radiograph on which the entire maxilla or mandible can be depicted on a single film.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ra·di·o·graph

(rā'dē-ō-graf'),
A negative image on photographic film made by exposure to x-rays or gamma rays that have passed through matter or tissue.
Synonym(s): roentgenogram, roentgenograph, x-ray (3)
[radio- + G. graphō, to write]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

radiograph

(rā′dē-ō-grăf′)
n.
An image produced by radiation, usually by x-rays, and recorded on a radiosensitive surface, such as photographic film, or by photographing a fluoroscopic image. Also called radiogram, shadowgraph, skiagram, skiagraph.
tr.v. radio·graphed, radio·graphing, radio·graphs
To make a radiograph of.

ra′di·og′ra·pher (-ŏg′rə-fər) n.
ra′di·o·graph′ic adj.
ra′di·o·graph′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

radiograph

An x-ray; a film produced by X-ray
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ra·di·o·graph

(rā'dē-ō-graf)
A negative image on photographic film made by exposure to x-rays that have passed through matter or tissue.
[radio- + G. graphō, to write]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Radiograph

The actual picture or film produced by an x-ray study.
Mentioned in: Skull X Rays
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Roentgen,

Wilhelm K., German physicist and Nobel laureate, 1845-1923.
roentgen - the international unit of exposure dose for x-rays or gamma rays.
roentgen ray - Synonym(s): x-ray
roentgenograph - Synonym(s): radiograph
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012

ra·di·o·graph

(rā'dē-ō-graf)
A negative image on photographic film made by exposure to x-rays or gamma rays.
Synonym(s): x-ray (3) .
[radio- + G. graphō, to write]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Periapical radiographs of maxillary incisors were used in our study for the assessment of root resorption.
A negative chest radiograph can be used to rule out the possibility of pneumonia in children suspected of having the disease, and therefore reduce antibiotic use, researchers say.
When taking a periapical radiograph, the top edge of the film should be slightly above the crowns of the teeth to avoid cutting off the roots of the teeth (1).
The number of radiographs that were diagnosed correctly as normal, small pneumothorax suspicion, moderate pneumothorax, and complete pneumothorax were recorded.
Retrospective analysis of trauma patients at an urban Level I Pediatric Trauma Center revealed that there was no information gained with the additional diagnostic test of pelvic radiograph against CT interpretation, and plain digital pelvic radiographs had less than desirable sensitivity in picking up fractures/subluxations (see Figure 1).
We acknowledge that there may be some perceived benefits for ordering serial radiographs for buckle fractures.
Consequently, the contribution of this revisited method is the ability to handle the drop-outs and unreliable parts of the prosthesis captured in radiographs. As the contour detection and a feature matching are not required by the intensity-based registration, the computation is much more simple in comparison with the previously published approaches.
Initial injury AP and lateral radiographs (a) demonstrate a radial neck fracture with 20-30[degrees] angulation (solid arrows in (a)) and a nondisplaced olecranon fracture (hatched arrow in (a)).
With all of these advancing technologies in forensic identification, there is still a critical need for dental professionals to be able to make comparisons of radiographs in a patient's chart or electronic record and radiographs of victims taken after a disaster.
Radiograph [Figure 1a] revealed incomplete obturation on both 46 and 47 and an extra root on 46.
A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed, 500 digital panoramic radiographs (ratio 1:1) taken in March of 2015 at the Dental Assisting Teaching Clinic, Dental School, Universidad de La Frontera (Temuco, Chile) were analyzed.
The formula derived for evaluating skeletal age in cephalometric radiographs is reliable and can be applied to both girl and boy subjects for legal requirements or therapeutic needs of age estimation.

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