radiodensity


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Related to radiodensity: radiolucent

radiopacity

 [ra″de-o-pas´ĭ-te]
the quality or property of being radiopaque.

ra·di·o·pac·i·ty

(rā'dē-ō-pas'i-tē),
The x-ray shadow of a radiopaque object.
Synonym(s): radiodensity

ra·di·o·pac·i·ty

(rā'dē-ō-pas'i-tē)
State of being radiopaque.
Synonym(s): radiodensity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The involved hip has a smaller ossific nucleus, often with increased radiodensity. Increase in joint space has been correlated with enlargement of the femoral head.
An overall homogeneous "ground glass" increase in radiodensity of the thoracic and abdominal cavities, accompanied by obvious distension of the caudal abdomen, usually is caused by ascites or peritonitis (Fig 4a).
Radiograph of abdomen in right lateral and ventro-dorsal views revealed fully distended urinary bladder with increased radiodensity (Fig.
Other diagnostic possibilities that can present with either radiodensity or lucency within the bone, including infection, benign or malignant neoplasm, or cysts should be considered.
Rather than resulting from the inexperience of radiologists, as was the case in the 1970s and 1980s, today the primary source of false-negative results are sophisticated smuggling techniques that attempt to limit detection by decreasing the radiodensity difference between drug packets and stool.
Prognosis for recovery was poor because of several factors: the contraindication for internal fixation based on thin femoral cortices with subjectively poor radiodensity on radiographs, a lack of documented techniques for external coaptation of bilateral femoral fractures, and concerns regarding the ability to adequately maintain the bird during a long convalescent period.
When a mass abuts a normal mediastinal structure of similar radiodensity, the margins of the 2 structures will be obliterated.
Radiolucent lines were defined as areas adjacent to the prosthesis of decreased radiodensity that appeared on follow-up radiographs that were not present on previous radiographs.
Radiographs revealed increased radiodensity and thickness of the descending aorta and a pectoral mass, and blood test results revealed anemia, hypocalcemia, hypoproteinemia, and hyperuricemia.
Survey radiographs in this case revealed multiple foreign bodies of varying radiodensity within the GI tract, and the perforation was not apparent.
The radiographic images revealed a diffuse increase in radiodensity of the body cavities with a loss of contrast and compression of the air sacs (Fig 1A and B).