radiocarpal


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radiocarpal

 [ra″de-o-kahr´pal]
pertaining to the radius and carpus.

ra·di·o·car·pal

(rā'dē-ō-kar'păl),
1. Relating to the radius and the bones of the carpus.
2. On the radial or lateral side of the carpus.

radiocarpal

/ra·dio·car·pal/ (-kahr´p'l) pertaining to the radius and carpus.

ra·di·o·car·pal

(rā'dē-ō-kahr'păl)
1. Relating to the radius and the bones of the carpus.
2. On the radial or lateral side of the carpus.

radiocarpal

pertaining to the radius and carpus.
References in periodicals archive ?
12,13] Although there is no threshold limit for distraction, but there is a correlation between increasing carpal height index and worse functional outcomes with distraction of 5-8 mm across the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints have no negative outcome.
For assessing synovitis in the wrist joints, we demonstrated high test accuracy between US and MR for the radiocarpal, midcarpal, and ulnocarpal joints.
The ligaments spanning the radiocarpal joint to connect the forearm bones with the carpal bones become slack and taut as the wrist is deviated and the forearm is rotated in different directions (Cailliet, 1982).
In our study 2 patients had developed radiocarpal arthritis, out of which one secondary to distal radius/radial styloid fracture.
Palmer and Werner (1981) demonstrated ulnar neutral wrists transfer approximately 18% of the total load applied, with the radiocarpal joint transferring 82% of the total load.
7] Disadvantages of this method include the long period of immobilization of the wrist, the need for a second operation to remove the hardware, potential attritional damage to the extensor tendons, difficulty in reducing and stabilizing the volar fragments of the distal radius, and the risks related to overdistraction of the radiocarpal joint (CPRS, finger functional impairement).
Some of the radiologic findings include joint effusion and soft-tissue swelling at the time of the pseudogout attacks, fractures in the surrounding bones; eg, tibia/carpal collapse due to radiocarpal osteoarthritis, also known as scapholunate advanced collapse of wrist; MCP joint involvement, and intervertebral disk calcification.
Gentle wrist range of motion demonstrated excellent stability of the construct with no signs of impingement at the radiocarpal joint (Figure 3).
INTRODUCTION: Fractures of the distal radius are the most common fractures of the upper extremity and account for 74% of all forearm fractures and 1/6th of all fractures treated in the emergency department; 50% involve the radiocarpal or radioulnar joints.
Of the 27 patients, 6 of them required additional procedures: 5 radiocarpal arthrodeses and 1 DRUJ prosthesis.