radiocarbon


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ra·di·o·car·bon

(rā'dē-ō-kar'bŏn),
A radioactive isotope of carbon, for example, 14C.

radiocarbon

Any of the radionuclides of carbon, the most common of which are 11C, which has a half-life of 20 minutes, and the beta-emitting 14C, which has a half-life of 5,730 years and is used to date archaeological, geological and hydrogeological material.

radiocarbon

(rā″dē-ō-kăr′bŏn)
A radioisotope of carbon; 11C and 14C are used in medical studies.
References in periodicals archive ?
The research also suggests that radiocarbon could be used to trace groundwater influences in surface water ecosystems, such as the fate of water produced by groundwater extraction and mining.
Radiocarbon dating by ceramics--5840 [+ or -] 90 BP is very close to this date (Table 1: 12).
Baggio, one of the lead researchers, said that it is especially important to study societies' resilience or the ability to recover from a disaster, over the long term, and radiocarbon dating is a useful tool for this assessment.
Even in its embryonic state, the technique is providing just as accurate results as radiocarbon dating.
Normally, radiocarbon dating has a 300-year margin of error.
The radiocarbon test is to see how much of these carbon atoms are still present on the test sample.
He calls his presentation, "The Shroud of Turin and Nuclear Physics: Why the Radiocarbon Dating Results is Proof of the Resurrection!"
Specifically, wc use a combination of particle-size fractionation, elemental analysis and radiocarbon dating to investigate the amount and mean retention time of SOC in fine soil particles and aggregates in this heavy-textured soil.
earthquake could have led to "wrong" 1988 radiocarbon dating of Shroud, suggested researchers.
Mulrooney's analysis of 313 radiocarbon dates from structures and settlements across Rapa Nui appears in the December Journal of Archaeological Science.
At four different locations on Baffin Island, Professor Gifford Miller and his colleagues used radiocarbon dating to show that dead moss clumps emerging from receding ice caps had not been exposed to the elements since at least 44,000-51,000 years ago.
Editors Shortland (archaeology & forensics, Cranfield U., U.K.) and Bronk Ramsey (archaeology, Oxford U., U.K.) present this radiocarbon analysis of pharaonic Egypt, largely supporting previously established historical timelines but presenting some novel results.