radiocalcium

ra·di·o·cal·ci·um

(rā'dē-ō-kal'sē-ŭm),
A radioisotope of calcium, particularly calcium 45.

radioactive calcium

Any of the radionuclides of calcium, the most common of which are the beta-emitting 45Ca, which has a half-life of 163 days, and the beta and gamma-emitting 47Ca, which has a half-life of 4.5 days and has some currency as a tracer for calcium metabolism studies.

radiocalcium

(rā″dē-ō-kăl′sē-ŭm)
A radioisotope of calcium; 45Ca and 47Ca are used in medical studies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cesari, "Comparison between the results of radiocalcium studies and histological findings in a case of primary hyperparathyroidism (osteitis fibrosa cystica generalisata of von Recklinghausen) before and after removal of parathyroid adenoma," Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol.
Comparison of bone formation rates measured by radiocalcium kinetics and double-tetracycline labeling in maintenance dialysis patients.
Studies with radiocalcium: The intestinal absorption of calcium.
Our results are similar to those previously observed, which showed a lack of correlation between 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and Ca absorption as assessed by radiocalcium in normal subjects [21, 22].