radioactive decay


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Related to radioactive decay: alpha decay, half life, radioactivity

radioactive decay

The continual loss of energy by radioactive substances. Disintegration of the nucleus by the emission of alpha, beta, or gamma rays eventually results in the complete loss of radioactivity. The time required for some materials to become stable may be minutes and, for others, thousands of years.
See: half-life
See also: decay
References in periodicals archive ?
In the special case of radioactive decay of vacuum (48) reduces to
In literature survey, radioactive decay is a random process and follows Poisson distribution, which is one of the discrete distributions.
The upward conduction of heat generated by radioactive decay within the over-thickened fertile lithospheric mantle will cause the increasing of temperature in the deep crust and the shallow mantle, and results in the decrease of seismic velocity in the shallow mantle, which is observed in the north part of Tibet plateau.
This interruption of neutrinos, due to the nucleons of Jupiter scattering and inelastically capturing some small, but non-trivial, proportion of particles and/or radiation causes a decrease in radioactive decay rate because of the consequent decrease in the particle flux transferring momentum to the nuclei of Po-210.
During radioactive decay, a material loses some of its energy by sending out particles and radiation.
The water is heated at great depth underground by natural radioactive decay ( but this does not means that the water is radioactive.
There,he was able to develop his understanding of nuclear physics,particularly radioactive decay.
This observation laid the groundwork for Rutherford's classic lecture on the concept of radioactive decay sequences, a presentation in which he gave frequent reference to the work of 'Miss Brooks.'
Here are two activities to help you better visualize the concept of radioactive decay and half-life.
The distribution of batting scores in Cricket shows an exponentially decreasing pattern similar to the radioactive decay curve.
Measurement of geological time by applying different geochronological techniques (radioactive decay, fission traces, fossil corals, varves, etc.) has enabled us to move beyond simple rock dating to more accurate quantitative measurements.