radical

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radical

 [rad´ĭ-kal]
1. thorough or sweeping; directed to the cause or root of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.
color radical chromophore.
free radical a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.
oxygen radical a toxic metabolite of oxygen, such as superoxide or singlet oxygen, capable of damaging microorganisms and normal tissues.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl), Do not confuse this word with radicle.
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (for example, methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process; for example, a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical
5. A functional group in a molecule or molecular entity.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

(răd′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Departing markedly from the usual or customary; extreme or drastic: a radical change in diet.
2. Medicine Relating to or being surgery that is extreme or drastic in an effort to eradicate all existing or potential disease: radical hysterectomy.
3. Botany
a. Of, relating to, or arising from a root: radical hairs.
b. Arising from the base of a stem or from a below-ground stem or rhizome: radical leaves.

rad′i·cal·ly adv.
rad′i·cal·ness n.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. chemistry A group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process, e.g., a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

(of plants) arising from the root or crown.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3).
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
[L. radix (radic-), root]
References in periodicals archive ?
What this exclusion reveals is the radicalness of this aesthetic, its insistence on a hunger of a certain order.
Factors used to evaluate the degree of risk associated with HRMIs are pervasiveness, magnitude, and radicalness (Wolfe, 1995).
He showed the radicalness of jubilee by reference to a foreign woman and a foreign general.
And this is because the radicalness of this act doesn't have to do with the political/philosophical stance you take on how people are educated.
Third, much hostility between ISNA and separate intersex support groups was over the perceived gender radicalness of ISNA, despite the fact mat ISNA repeatedly stated it favored binary sex determination of infants rather than gender neutral rearing.
(5) It seemed one's radicalness was a function of class and ideology, where nothing short of a complete overthrow of the capitalist system through a working-class rebellion met the standard.
The most predictable and, I think, persuasive criticism that could be made of a rights-inspired interpretation of s 117 amounts to an argument concerning legitimacy--an argument concerning the legitimacy and radicalness of the theoretical underpinnings of this suggested interpretation, rather than its likely outcomes when applied to real disputes.
MARK: It doesn't speak to the radicalness of the "breaks."
Consequently, the degree of an innovation's "radicalness" can be unique for every firm within the same industry.