radical

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radical

 [rad´ĭ-kal]
1. thorough or sweeping; directed to the cause or root of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.
color radical chromophore.
free radical a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.
oxygen radical a toxic metabolite of oxygen, such as superoxide or singlet oxygen, capable of damaging microorganisms and normal tissues.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl), Do not confuse this word with radicle.
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (for example, methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process; for example, a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical
5. A functional group in a molecule or molecular entity.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

(răd′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Departing markedly from the usual or customary; extreme or drastic: a radical change in diet.
2. Medicine Relating to or being surgery that is extreme or drastic in an effort to eradicate all existing or potential disease: radical hysterectomy.
3. Botany
a. Of, relating to, or arising from a root: radical hairs.
b. Arising from the base of a stem or from a below-ground stem or rhizome: radical leaves.

rad′i·cal·ly adv.
rad′i·cal·ness n.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. chemistry A group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process, e.g., a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

(of plants) arising from the root or crown.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3).
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
[L. radix (radic-), root]
References in periodicals archive ?
The book is comprised of nine chapters, all of approximately equal length, an introduction, and a conclusion, and begins with a lucid discussion of the eighteenth-century background to radicalism and the ambiguity the term had acquired, even as early as the reign of George III (1760-1820).
As radicalism inside and outside Parliament moved forward through the eighteenth century and into the nineteenth, the field in which it played a role grew ever wider and its meaning and significance became more complex.
He does this by taking four cuts into the history of German radicalism: the first involving the Jacobin episode in Mainz in 1792-93, together with the cognate histories in Baden and Wurttemberg in the later 1790s; the second focusing on the mainly student radicalism of the Restoration period after 1814, culminating in the repressive Carlsbad Decrees of 1819; the third surveying the radical upsurge of 1830-34 in response to the 1830 French Revolution, concentrating on the southwest, but also incorporating central Germany and Hanover; and the last concerning the story of the 1848 revolution in the southwest.
Thus the story of nineteenth-century radicalism, in this view, is one of unrequited popular appeal, in which ordinary people resisted the wiles of the radicals, who were thereby revealed as marginal individuals, "enrages and bellicose crackpots,' "wild men," and so on (pp.
Indeed, the example of Negro Story could be seen in retrospect as a paradigmatic moment in African American literary radicalism of the 1940s, where the means of production and the production of means necessary for formulating a resistant literary culture attained simultaneous autonomy.